Participation Type

Film

Session Title

Session 8.13 Environment and Ecology

Presentation #1 Title

Goodbye Gauley Mountain: An Ecosexual Love Story

Presentation #1 Abstract

I propose to screen my film, Goodbye Gauley Mountain: An Ecosexual Love Story. http://goodbyegauleymountain.org Big corporations are busy blowing the tops off of mountains in Appalachia using a devastating technique known as mountain top removal (MTR). In response, two San Francisco ecosexuals, Beth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle, journey to Beth’s hometown in the shadow of Gauley Mountain where they join radical hillbillies, tree-huggers, and long time residents to fight MTR’s destruction. This film documents the way rural communities fight annihilation in the face of short-term corporate greed, it follows our ecosexual activists who put their bodies on the line to try to stop it. Featuring tree hugging, skinny-dipping, interviews and a wedding to the Appalachian Mountains, it shows how the fight against environmental injustice can be sexy, fun, and diverse in order to try to open up spaces of hope in a sacrifice zone.

At-A-Glance Bios- Presenter #1

Elizabeth M. Stephens is an internationally recognized artist, as well as an activist and professor of art at UC Santa Cruz. Her most recent documentary, Goodbye Gauley Mountain: An Ecosexual Love Story has screened in Canada, Mexico, Spain, France and England as well as in the United States. Stephens is West Virginia native.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 29th, 2:30 PM Mar 29th, 3:45 PM

Goodbye Gauley Mountain: An Ecosexual Love Story

Drinko Library 402

I propose to screen my film, Goodbye Gauley Mountain: An Ecosexual Love Story. http://goodbyegauleymountain.org Big corporations are busy blowing the tops off of mountains in Appalachia using a devastating technique known as mountain top removal (MTR). In response, two San Francisco ecosexuals, Beth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle, journey to Beth’s hometown in the shadow of Gauley Mountain where they join radical hillbillies, tree-huggers, and long time residents to fight MTR’s destruction. This film documents the way rural communities fight annihilation in the face of short-term corporate greed, it follows our ecosexual activists who put their bodies on the line to try to stop it. Featuring tree hugging, skinny-dipping, interviews and a wedding to the Appalachian Mountains, it shows how the fight against environmental injustice can be sexy, fun, and diverse in order to try to open up spaces of hope in a sacrifice zone.