Participation Type

Paper

Session Title

Session 9.05 Arts and Crafts

About the Presenter

Carter T. SeatonFollow

Presentation #1 Title

Hippie Homesteaders: What they mean to the arts, crafts, and music of West Virginia

Presentation #1 Abstract or Summary

My presentation will discuss the results of two years of research into the impact made on WV's cultural climate by the influx of the back-to-the-land musicians, artists, and other performers who arrived in the 1960s and 1970s. I will cover the social unrest of that period, what drove the homesteaders to WV, what they encountered, how they became successful, and the ultimate impact they have had on our state. I will also discuss how they adapted to the state's culture and learned from it. My research included interviews with 45 artisans and performers who still reside in WV. The coincidental timing of their arrival and the successful outreach program of WV's Commerce Department is partially responsible for their success. From my research I learned that some of these transplants were the basis of the internationally known radio program, "Mountain Stage." Further, many of the initial artisans at Tamarack were among this group. The research resulted in "Hippie Homesteaders: Arts, Crafts, Music and Living on the Land in West Virginia, published in 2014 by WVU Press.

At-A-Glance Bio- Presenter #1

Carter Taylor Seaton is the author of two novels, Father’s Troubles, and amo, amas, amat…an unconventional love story, numerous magazine articles, and several essays and short stories, and her newest book, the non-fiction, Hippie Homesteaders, was published in April 2014 by West Virginia University Press. She holds a Tamarack Foundation Fellowship Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Arts and the West Virginia Library Association honored her with the 2014 WVLA Literary Merit Award.

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Mar 29th, 9:15 AM Mar 29th, 10:30 AM

Hippie Homesteaders: What they mean to the arts, crafts, and music of West Virginia

My presentation will discuss the results of two years of research into the impact made on WV's cultural climate by the influx of the back-to-the-land musicians, artists, and other performers who arrived in the 1960s and 1970s. I will cover the social unrest of that period, what drove the homesteaders to WV, what they encountered, how they became successful, and the ultimate impact they have had on our state. I will also discuss how they adapted to the state's culture and learned from it. My research included interviews with 45 artisans and performers who still reside in WV. The coincidental timing of their arrival and the successful outreach program of WV's Commerce Department is partially responsible for their success. From my research I learned that some of these transplants were the basis of the internationally known radio program, "Mountain Stage." Further, many of the initial artisans at Tamarack were among this group. The research resulted in "Hippie Homesteaders: Arts, Crafts, Music and Living on the Land in West Virginia, published in 2014 by WVU Press.