Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

psychology, transgender, service learning

Biography

Olivia, Keith, Maggie, Taylor, Tayler, and Ashlee are all completing Psychology of Women as a capstone-level, service-learning course this semester. The students designed and are completing this project for course credit.

Major

Psychology

Advisor for this project

Dawn Howerton, Associate Professor, Psychology

Start Date

20-4-2017 10:45 AM

End Date

20-4-2017 12:00 PM

Abstract

In the United States it is estimated that 1.4 million adults are transgender (Flores, Herman, Gates, & Brown, 2016), and West Virginia leads the country with the largest number of teens, 13-17 years of age, who identify as transgender (1.04%; Herman, Flores, Brown, Williams, & Conron, 2017). Many transgender teens are financially cut off by their families (Lambda Legal, 2017), and transgender Americans are four times more likely than the general population to report a household income of less than $10,000 (Center for American Progress, 2015). This is especially concerning because 87% of transgender individuals report having completed at least some college, and 47% have earned a college degree (Center for American Progress, 2015). On college campuses 41% of transgender students are estimated to be harassed, but only 28% report the harassment which lays the groundwork for the need for acceptance and visibility on campuses (Dugan, Kusel, & Simounet, 2012 ). A study at the University of Michigan suggested that transgender students report educational barriers on college campuses, including inadequate support for transgender students in terms of health care and counseling provided by the college (Matney, 2003). The current project seeks to place collection bins on Marshall University’s campus for clothing for transgender students. After the collection, the closet will enable an experience where those who identify as part of the LGBT community will be able to comfortably explore their gender identity in various ways in a safe place. Specifically, we will have clothes for them to try on and peers to support and talk with each other. Most of all, this experience will establish a lasting atmosphere of acceptance and a closet in the LGBT office which will always be ready for use for years to come.

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Apr 20th, 10:45 AM Apr 20th, 12:00 PM

Marshall Community Trans Clothing Closet

In the United States it is estimated that 1.4 million adults are transgender (Flores, Herman, Gates, & Brown, 2016), and West Virginia leads the country with the largest number of teens, 13-17 years of age, who identify as transgender (1.04%; Herman, Flores, Brown, Williams, & Conron, 2017). Many transgender teens are financially cut off by their families (Lambda Legal, 2017), and transgender Americans are four times more likely than the general population to report a household income of less than $10,000 (Center for American Progress, 2015). This is especially concerning because 87% of transgender individuals report having completed at least some college, and 47% have earned a college degree (Center for American Progress, 2015). On college campuses 41% of transgender students are estimated to be harassed, but only 28% report the harassment which lays the groundwork for the need for acceptance and visibility on campuses (Dugan, Kusel, & Simounet, 2012 ). A study at the University of Michigan suggested that transgender students report educational barriers on college campuses, including inadequate support for transgender students in terms of health care and counseling provided by the college (Matney, 2003). The current project seeks to place collection bins on Marshall University’s campus for clothing for transgender students. After the collection, the closet will enable an experience where those who identify as part of the LGBT community will be able to comfortably explore their gender identity in various ways in a safe place. Specifically, we will have clothes for them to try on and peers to support and talk with each other. Most of all, this experience will establish a lasting atmosphere of acceptance and a closet in the LGBT office which will always be ready for use for years to come.