Presentation Title

American Flooding and National Security

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

Flooding, United States, National Security, Economy

Biography

My name is Tavish Riley, and I am currently working on my undergraduate degree in Geography at Marshall University. The emphasis of my degree is on meteorology and its effects on society. My passion in life is helping others, and by studying geographical data in relation to natural disasters, I hope to make the world a better place with this information.

Major

Geography

Advisor for this project

Anita Walz

Start Date

20-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

20-4-2017 2:45 PM

Abstract

Flooding is a powerful force of nature that shows no inherent care for where it strikes. This study mapped flood locations and frequencies in the United States. The data presented is an analysis of major flood events in the lower forty-eight states between 1970-2016. The maps reflect the death tolls, locations, and overall cost of their damages, along with precipitation data and stream gauge readings. This study focuses on larger flood events, particularly those resulting in true damage to both the nation’s infrastructure and economy.

Results suggest that there are areas in the United States that have higher potential for a flood event to occur. The relationship of flooding and its toll on the United States economy has shown a steady increase in its cost over time, more so in the more present years. The correlation between flood events and their locations indicates some areas are more susceptible to these incidents. The question is, why are precautions not being taken seriously to withstand these events? Also, if we are funding these endeavors, why is flood prevention still nonexistent during these major events? Some areas show that the flood frequency is considerably higher compared to other regions. This can be attributed to many different factors, but when compared to other regions with presumably the same demographic that are not affected as much, the question arises if politics have something to do with the prevention of flooding in these popular flood areas.

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Apr 20th, 1:30 PM Apr 20th, 2:45 PM

American Flooding and National Security

Flooding is a powerful force of nature that shows no inherent care for where it strikes. This study mapped flood locations and frequencies in the United States. The data presented is an analysis of major flood events in the lower forty-eight states between 1970-2016. The maps reflect the death tolls, locations, and overall cost of their damages, along with precipitation data and stream gauge readings. This study focuses on larger flood events, particularly those resulting in true damage to both the nation’s infrastructure and economy.

Results suggest that there are areas in the United States that have higher potential for a flood event to occur. The relationship of flooding and its toll on the United States economy has shown a steady increase in its cost over time, more so in the more present years. The correlation between flood events and their locations indicates some areas are more susceptible to these incidents. The question is, why are precautions not being taken seriously to withstand these events? Also, if we are funding these endeavors, why is flood prevention still nonexistent during these major events? Some areas show that the flood frequency is considerably higher compared to other regions. This can be attributed to many different factors, but when compared to other regions with presumably the same demographic that are not affected as much, the question arises if politics have something to do with the prevention of flooding in these popular flood areas.