Presentation Title

Contrasting Styles of Senatorial Leadership: A Comparative Case Study of the Differing Managerial Styles of United States Senators Robert C. Byrd and Lyndon B. Johnson, and their Alignment with Situational Organizational Management Theory.

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

Senate, Leadership, Management

Biography

I am a graduate student in the Master of Arts in Political Science program at Marshall University in Huntington,WV. I am interested in the intersection between organizational management theory and political leadership in the United States Senate. I aspire to pursuing a career in education.

Major

Master of Arts in Political Science

Advisor for this project

Dr. Charles Damien Arthur

Start Date

20-4-2017 9:15 AM

End Date

20-4-2017 10:30 AM

Abstract

Contrasting Styles of Senatorial Leadership: A Comparative Case Study of the Differing Managerial Styles of United States Senators Robert C. Byrd and Lyndon B. Johnson, and their Alignment with Situational Organizational Management Theory.

This paper purports to examine the Senatorial leadership careers of Senator Robert C. Byrd and Senator Lyndon B. Johnson across the context of situational organizational management theory as originally applied to non-profit organizations and for-profit private enterprises. Both Robert C. Byrd and Lyndon B. Johnson exhibited contextual management styles during their respective periods of Senatorial leadership, using the both the application and foreclosure of Senate rules to their advantage based on whatever opportunities the political situation presented. However, there are distinct differences in the political situations that each faced and the methods applied that allowed each of them to climb to positions of Senatorial leadership. This paper will attempt to analyze, synthesize, and compare the differences & patterns, across contextual differences, of the influences that contributed to the success of each Senator’s method of assentation to leadership. These methods will be compared against measures considered to be situationally appropriate in the discipline of organizational management. Also, this study will compare the key dimensions of causation that led to the arrival of two distinctly different approaches, that ultimately achieved the same results under varying political conditions. A mixed methods approach will be employed to ensure high levels of internal validity and generalizability.

This paper purports to examine the Senatorial leadership careers of Senator Robert C. Byrd and Senator Lyndon B. Johnson across the context of situational organizational management theory as originally applied to non-profit organizations and for-profit private enterprises. Both Robert C. Byrd and Lyndon B. Johnson exhibited contextual management styles during their respective periods of Senatorial leadership, using the both the application and foreclosure of Senate rules to their advantage based on whatever opportunities the political situation presented. However, there are distinct differences in the political situations that each faced and the methods applied that allowed each of them to climb to positions of Senatorial leadership. This paper will attempt to analyze, synthesize, and compare the differences & patterns, across contextual differences, of the influences that contributed to the success of each Senator’s method of assentation to leadership. These methods will be compared against measures considered to be situationally appropriate in the discipline of organizational management. Also, this study will compare the key dimensions of causation that led to the arrival of two distinctly different approaches, that ultimately achieved the same results under varying political conditions. A mixed methods approach will be employed to ensure high levels of internal validity and generalizability.

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Apr 20th, 9:15 AM Apr 20th, 10:30 AM

Contrasting Styles of Senatorial Leadership: A Comparative Case Study of the Differing Managerial Styles of United States Senators Robert C. Byrd and Lyndon B. Johnson, and their Alignment with Situational Organizational Management Theory.

Contrasting Styles of Senatorial Leadership: A Comparative Case Study of the Differing Managerial Styles of United States Senators Robert C. Byrd and Lyndon B. Johnson, and their Alignment with Situational Organizational Management Theory.

This paper purports to examine the Senatorial leadership careers of Senator Robert C. Byrd and Senator Lyndon B. Johnson across the context of situational organizational management theory as originally applied to non-profit organizations and for-profit private enterprises. Both Robert C. Byrd and Lyndon B. Johnson exhibited contextual management styles during their respective periods of Senatorial leadership, using the both the application and foreclosure of Senate rules to their advantage based on whatever opportunities the political situation presented. However, there are distinct differences in the political situations that each faced and the methods applied that allowed each of them to climb to positions of Senatorial leadership. This paper will attempt to analyze, synthesize, and compare the differences & patterns, across contextual differences, of the influences that contributed to the success of each Senator’s method of assentation to leadership. These methods will be compared against measures considered to be situationally appropriate in the discipline of organizational management. Also, this study will compare the key dimensions of causation that led to the arrival of two distinctly different approaches, that ultimately achieved the same results under varying political conditions. A mixed methods approach will be employed to ensure high levels of internal validity and generalizability.

This paper purports to examine the Senatorial leadership careers of Senator Robert C. Byrd and Senator Lyndon B. Johnson across the context of situational organizational management theory as originally applied to non-profit organizations and for-profit private enterprises. Both Robert C. Byrd and Lyndon B. Johnson exhibited contextual management styles during their respective periods of Senatorial leadership, using the both the application and foreclosure of Senate rules to their advantage based on whatever opportunities the political situation presented. However, there are distinct differences in the political situations that each faced and the methods applied that allowed each of them to climb to positions of Senatorial leadership. This paper will attempt to analyze, synthesize, and compare the differences & patterns, across contextual differences, of the influences that contributed to the success of each Senator’s method of assentation to leadership. These methods will be compared against measures considered to be situationally appropriate in the discipline of organizational management. Also, this study will compare the key dimensions of causation that led to the arrival of two distinctly different approaches, that ultimately achieved the same results under varying political conditions. A mixed methods approach will be employed to ensure high levels of internal validity and generalizability.