Presentation Title

Investigating Public Opinions of Breastfeeding

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

breastfeeding, public opinion, united states

Biography

I am a wife, mother to a beautiful one year old girl named Aliza, and graduating in May with my bachelors in public communications with a minor in Spanish. I enjoy working with the public, specifically understanding what motivates people and how communication and rhetoric influences an individual's decision. I I look forward to graduating and beginning my professional career.

Major

Public Communication Studies

Advisor for this project

Camilla Brammer

Start Date

20-4-2017 9:15 AM

End Date

20-4-2017 10:30 AM

Abstract

Abstract

Brooke Rinaldi

The Purpose of the Research:

The purpose of this research is to further understand the reasons why people feel the way they do about breastfeeding, as well as the analysis of opinions about breastfeeding in public

The Scientific or Scholarly Rationale:

Breastfeeding mothers have long been judged for breastfeeding their offspring, both in the public and private setting. In the private setting, people will often feel that breastfeeding isn’t “enough” for the complete nutrition of the child. Many mothers are often made to believe that they will not or do not make enough milk because their mother didn’t. In the public sphere, mothers are shamed due to their exposure of the breast. These opinions stem from communication messages formed often in an online community, but also interpersonally as well. But, where do these opinions come from? Do these opinions stem from areas of low SES? Or do they stem from the individual’s exposure to siblings being breastfed in the home, parents talking to them about different ways babies are fed. Does education factor these opinions? Many studies have shown why a mother would chose to breastfeed for health reasons, concerning both the child and the mother. However, little to no studies have been done that show the variables that help inform rationale for public opinion on breastfeeding.

Dunn, R. L., Kalich, K. A., Henning, M. J., & Fedrizzi, R. (2015). Engaging field-based professionals in a qualitative assessment of barriers and positive contributors to breastfeeding using the social ecological model. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 19(1), 6-16. doi:http://muezproxy.marshall.edu:2103/10.1007/s10995-014-1488-x

Ekström, A., Widström, A., & Nissen, E. (2003). Breastfeeding Support from Partners and Grandmothers: Perceptions of Swedish Women. Birth: Issues In Perinatal Care, 30(4), 261-266. doi:10.1046/j.1523-536X.2003.00256.x

Gray, J. (2013). Feeding on the web: Online social support in the breastfeeding context.Communication Research Reports, 30(1), 1-11. doi:10.1080/08824096.2012.746219

Hyde, J. S., DeLemaster, J.D., Plant, E. A. , & Byrd, J.M. (1996) Sexuality During Pregnancy and the Year Postpartum. Journal of Sex Research. June 1996; 33(2): 143-151 Available from: Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed November 28, 2016.

Kuehl, R. A., Drury, S. A. M., & Anderson, J. (2015). Civic engagement and public health issues: Community support for breastfeeding through rhetoric and health communication collaborations. Communication Quarterly, 63(5), 510. doi:10.1080/01463373.2015.1103598

Koerber, A. (2006). Rhetorical agency, resistance, and the disciplinary rhetorics of breastfeeding. Technical Communication Quarterly, 15(1), 87-101. doi:10.1207/s15427625tcq1501_7

Lee, H. J., Elo, I. T., McCollum, K. F., & Culhane, J. F. (2009). Racial/Ethnic Differences in Breastfeeding Initiation and Duration Among Low-Income Inner-City Mothers. Social Science Quarterly (Wiley-Blackwell), 90(5), 1251-1271. doi:10.1111/j.1540-6237.2009.00656.x

Lording, R. (2010). Breast is best . but not everywhere: Ambivalent sexism and attitudes toward private and public breastfeeding. Breastfeeding Review, 18(3), 31.

Mohamad, E. (2013). Normalising breastfeeding: What can media do to help? Journal of Asian Pacific Communication, 23(2), 196-210. doi:10.1075/japc.23.2.02moh

Sarkar, N. N. (2008). The impact of intimate partner violence on women's reproductive health and pregnancy outcome. Journal Of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 28(3), 266-271. doi:10.1080/01443610802042415

Vaaler, M. L., Castrucci, B. C., Parks, S. E., Clark, J., Stagg, J., & Erickson, T. (2011). Men's attitudes toward breastfeeding: Findings from the 2007 texas behavioral risk factor surveillance system. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 15(2), 148. doi:10.1007/s10995-010-0605-8

The Procedures to be Performed:

A survey, made available on Survey Monkey, will be opened to the public for one month. The survey link will also be shared on Facebook. Participants will be anyone 18 years or older that display an interest in further understanding where opinions of breastfeeding come from.

The Risks and Potential Benefits of the Research:

There is no risk or potential benefit to the research participants as the survey is online and completely anonymous.

Complete Inclusion/Exclusion Criteria (may be submitted separately if extensive):

All individuals over the age of 18 are eligible to participate in the study.

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Apr 20th, 9:15 AM Apr 20th, 10:30 AM

Investigating Public Opinions of Breastfeeding

Abstract

Brooke Rinaldi

The Purpose of the Research:

The purpose of this research is to further understand the reasons why people feel the way they do about breastfeeding, as well as the analysis of opinions about breastfeeding in public

The Scientific or Scholarly Rationale:

Breastfeeding mothers have long been judged for breastfeeding their offspring, both in the public and private setting. In the private setting, people will often feel that breastfeeding isn’t “enough” for the complete nutrition of the child. Many mothers are often made to believe that they will not or do not make enough milk because their mother didn’t. In the public sphere, mothers are shamed due to their exposure of the breast. These opinions stem from communication messages formed often in an online community, but also interpersonally as well. But, where do these opinions come from? Do these opinions stem from areas of low SES? Or do they stem from the individual’s exposure to siblings being breastfed in the home, parents talking to them about different ways babies are fed. Does education factor these opinions? Many studies have shown why a mother would chose to breastfeed for health reasons, concerning both the child and the mother. However, little to no studies have been done that show the variables that help inform rationale for public opinion on breastfeeding.

Dunn, R. L., Kalich, K. A., Henning, M. J., & Fedrizzi, R. (2015). Engaging field-based professionals in a qualitative assessment of barriers and positive contributors to breastfeeding using the social ecological model. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 19(1), 6-16. doi:http://muezproxy.marshall.edu:2103/10.1007/s10995-014-1488-x

Ekström, A., Widström, A., & Nissen, E. (2003). Breastfeeding Support from Partners and Grandmothers: Perceptions of Swedish Women. Birth: Issues In Perinatal Care, 30(4), 261-266. doi:10.1046/j.1523-536X.2003.00256.x

Gray, J. (2013). Feeding on the web: Online social support in the breastfeeding context.Communication Research Reports, 30(1), 1-11. doi:10.1080/08824096.2012.746219

Hyde, J. S., DeLemaster, J.D., Plant, E. A. , & Byrd, J.M. (1996) Sexuality During Pregnancy and the Year Postpartum. Journal of Sex Research. June 1996; 33(2): 143-151 Available from: Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed November 28, 2016.

Kuehl, R. A., Drury, S. A. M., & Anderson, J. (2015). Civic engagement and public health issues: Community support for breastfeeding through rhetoric and health communication collaborations. Communication Quarterly, 63(5), 510. doi:10.1080/01463373.2015.1103598

Koerber, A. (2006). Rhetorical agency, resistance, and the disciplinary rhetorics of breastfeeding. Technical Communication Quarterly, 15(1), 87-101. doi:10.1207/s15427625tcq1501_7

Lee, H. J., Elo, I. T., McCollum, K. F., & Culhane, J. F. (2009). Racial/Ethnic Differences in Breastfeeding Initiation and Duration Among Low-Income Inner-City Mothers. Social Science Quarterly (Wiley-Blackwell), 90(5), 1251-1271. doi:10.1111/j.1540-6237.2009.00656.x

Lording, R. (2010). Breast is best . but not everywhere: Ambivalent sexism and attitudes toward private and public breastfeeding. Breastfeeding Review, 18(3), 31.

Mohamad, E. (2013). Normalising breastfeeding: What can media do to help? Journal of Asian Pacific Communication, 23(2), 196-210. doi:10.1075/japc.23.2.02moh

Sarkar, N. N. (2008). The impact of intimate partner violence on women's reproductive health and pregnancy outcome. Journal Of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 28(3), 266-271. doi:10.1080/01443610802042415

Vaaler, M. L., Castrucci, B. C., Parks, S. E., Clark, J., Stagg, J., & Erickson, T. (2011). Men's attitudes toward breastfeeding: Findings from the 2007 texas behavioral risk factor surveillance system. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 15(2), 148. doi:10.1007/s10995-010-0605-8

The Procedures to be Performed:

A survey, made available on Survey Monkey, will be opened to the public for one month. The survey link will also be shared on Facebook. Participants will be anyone 18 years or older that display an interest in further understanding where opinions of breastfeeding come from.

The Risks and Potential Benefits of the Research:

There is no risk or potential benefit to the research participants as the survey is online and completely anonymous.

Complete Inclusion/Exclusion Criteria (may be submitted separately if extensive):

All individuals over the age of 18 are eligible to participate in the study.