Presentation Title

Protest Culture's Influence on Popular Music in France and America

Presenter Information

Joshua MannFollow

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

Protest culture, protest music, popular music

Biography

My name is Joshua Mann and I am a senior studying Political Science. I am from Huntington, West Virginia and hope to pursue a career in technical writing upon graduation.

Major

Political Science

Advisor for this project

Jamie Warner

Start Date

20-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

20-4-2017 2:45 PM

Abstract

The landscape of the American radio scene, as well as the American protest scene, has undergone significant changes over the past fifty years. Used as a conduit to reflect our culture during turbulent times, the radio provided a soundtrack to this backdrop, while also giving the American citizens an empathic voice. In this paper, I will attempt to delve into what is needed to understand when examining why the American radio lost its consciousness, despite having never lost its turbulent times. Specifically, I will compare and contrast the radio content, as well as the protest culture, of the United States and France, two countries with a similar history over the last fifty years, in hopes to conclude why it is that we no longer want those empathetic voices on our radio.

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Apr 20th, 1:30 PM Apr 20th, 2:45 PM

Protest Culture's Influence on Popular Music in France and America

The landscape of the American radio scene, as well as the American protest scene, has undergone significant changes over the past fifty years. Used as a conduit to reflect our culture during turbulent times, the radio provided a soundtrack to this backdrop, while also giving the American citizens an empathic voice. In this paper, I will attempt to delve into what is needed to understand when examining why the American radio lost its consciousness, despite having never lost its turbulent times. Specifically, I will compare and contrast the radio content, as well as the protest culture, of the United States and France, two countries with a similar history over the last fifty years, in hopes to conclude why it is that we no longer want those empathetic voices on our radio.