Presentation Title

Neurobiology of BPD: Abnormalities in the Cerebral Cortex and Limbic System

Document Type

Poster Presentation

Keywords

BPD, abnormalities, brain

Biography

My name is Rachael Deck, I am a senior with three majors and a minor here at Marshall University. I am a part of 5 honor societies on campus and I aspire to be a neuropsychiatrist. I enjoy learning about the functioning of the brain regions in people with mental disorders. I am currently interested in studies that involve brain imaging to find the etiology of disorders and how this information is used to structure treatment methods. After graduating with a bachelor's, I will enroll in graduate school to obtain a master's in psychology, and then to doctorate school.

Major

Psychology

Advisor for this project

Dr. Penny Koontz

Start Date

20-4-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

20-4-2017 3:00 PM

Abstract

Since the first diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder, identification of the regions of the brain contributing to this disorder has created skepticism. Although some researchers and theorists have speculated that there are brain abnormalities in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), temporal lobes, and limbic areas, the specific roles of the subdivision structures in the etiology of BPD have not been determined. As a result of emotional dysregulation being at the core of BPD, the amygdala and hippocampus have been at the focus of neuroimaging and structural imaging research. Though current psychological approaches and meditation treatment methods have proven successful in alleviating distress pain and improving emotional stability, a theory that weaves these approaches and data into a whole, does not exist. In this literature review, I will examine imaging studies that represent both females and males, designed to determine the significance of deficits in grey and white matter volumes in the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices, the GM volume as it relates to impulsivity in men, abnormal cortisol reactivity in the hypothalamus, and abnormalities in the hippocampal-amygdala complex. Limitations of this review are that more female than male participants are included, and small sample sizes within the included studies. Without more research being conducted on the dysfunctions of the PFC and limbic structure and a greater understanding of the neurocognitive dimensions underlying BPD, treatment cannot evolve for patients. Future research should examine brain morphological differences in this clinical population.

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Apr 20th, 2:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:00 PM

Neurobiology of BPD: Abnormalities in the Cerebral Cortex and Limbic System

Since the first diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder, identification of the regions of the brain contributing to this disorder has created skepticism. Although some researchers and theorists have speculated that there are brain abnormalities in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), temporal lobes, and limbic areas, the specific roles of the subdivision structures in the etiology of BPD have not been determined. As a result of emotional dysregulation being at the core of BPD, the amygdala and hippocampus have been at the focus of neuroimaging and structural imaging research. Though current psychological approaches and meditation treatment methods have proven successful in alleviating distress pain and improving emotional stability, a theory that weaves these approaches and data into a whole, does not exist. In this literature review, I will examine imaging studies that represent both females and males, designed to determine the significance of deficits in grey and white matter volumes in the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices, the GM volume as it relates to impulsivity in men, abnormal cortisol reactivity in the hypothalamus, and abnormalities in the hippocampal-amygdala complex. Limitations of this review are that more female than male participants are included, and small sample sizes within the included studies. Without more research being conducted on the dysfunctions of the PFC and limbic structure and a greater understanding of the neurocognitive dimensions underlying BPD, treatment cannot evolve for patients. Future research should examine brain morphological differences in this clinical population.