Presentation Title

Progressing Towards the Future

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

History, Civil Rights, students

Biography

Joe Gates is a Freshman at Marshall University, originally from Parkersburg, West Virginia. Currently majoring in Journalism with a double minor in English and Sexuality Studies, Gates hopes to find a career path that will allow his writing to expose the stories of those who face hardships with Civil Rights across the nation.

Major

Journalism

Advisor for this project

John Stromski

Start Date

21-4-2017 10:45 AM

End Date

21-4-2017 12:00 PM

Abstract

In the book, The American College Town, author Blake Gumprechet claims that college towns are often seen as spaces that are more progressive and open-minded than the surrounding areas. However, a look through the Marshall University Archives reveals that this wasn't always the case for Huntington's campus. This presentation discusses the ways that representations and discussions of minority student groups have changed over the course of Marshall’s history. By looking at a collection of articles published in The Parthenon during the 1960’s, my paper is able to discuss some of Marshall's past.

This paper follows The Parthenon storyline of the Civil Interest Progressives, a student ran Civil Rights group who held a variety of functions to help further racial equality in Huntington. Though the town may not seem like a center for student protests, the Civil Interest Progressives are among one of the best examples in Marshall's history showing how students helped to ensure a welcoming campus for a variety of students. Through a combination of meetings, sit-ins, and aggressive demonstrations, the group was able to promote equality throughout the town.

Together these articles highlight an important part of Marshall's history, exposing how students have promoted and provided acceptance during divided times. Student group can often times act as the voice of a campus, and this paper is able to highlight one of the most crucial conversations to occur on Marshall's campus.

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Apr 21st, 10:45 AM Apr 21st, 12:00 PM

Progressing Towards the Future

In the book, The American College Town, author Blake Gumprechet claims that college towns are often seen as spaces that are more progressive and open-minded than the surrounding areas. However, a look through the Marshall University Archives reveals that this wasn't always the case for Huntington's campus. This presentation discusses the ways that representations and discussions of minority student groups have changed over the course of Marshall’s history. By looking at a collection of articles published in The Parthenon during the 1960’s, my paper is able to discuss some of Marshall's past.

This paper follows The Parthenon storyline of the Civil Interest Progressives, a student ran Civil Rights group who held a variety of functions to help further racial equality in Huntington. Though the town may not seem like a center for student protests, the Civil Interest Progressives are among one of the best examples in Marshall's history showing how students helped to ensure a welcoming campus for a variety of students. Through a combination of meetings, sit-ins, and aggressive demonstrations, the group was able to promote equality throughout the town.

Together these articles highlight an important part of Marshall's history, exposing how students have promoted and provided acceptance during divided times. Student group can often times act as the voice of a campus, and this paper is able to highlight one of the most crucial conversations to occur on Marshall's campus.