Presentation Title

Marshall University's Progress Through NAGPRA

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

Culture, NAGPRA, Marshall

Biography

Jocelyn Taylor is a student at Marshall University pursuing a bachelor's degree in anthropology with minors in German and Geology.

Major

Anthropology

Advisor for this project

Marty Laubach

Start Date

21-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

21-4-2017 2:45 PM

Abstract

Project Abstract

Marshall University’s Progress Through NAGPRA

Jocelyn Taylor

NAGPRA: Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act, Nov 16, 1990. This research paper analyzes the importance, effectiveness, and process of NAGPRA, with hands on research through Marshall University. The paper will record the University’s progress in compliance with NAGPRA in the Spring semester of 2017, while also standing as a written record for the university’s past experiences with the act. The research begins with Dr. Nicholas Freidin, professor of anthropology and archaeology, as the University prepares for a repatriation event on April 17-20, 2017, on campus. The technicalities of the law are addressed and the University’s progress with the steps are explained. During the repatriation event, interviews will be conducted with social scientists and Native American representatives who wish to participate in this research. There will also be interviews with Dr. Freidin and the University’s NAGPRA consultant. I expect to find a similar consensus in response to the interview questions, in that the NAGPRA law is effective, but could still be improved.

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Apr 21st, 1:30 PM Apr 21st, 2:45 PM

Marshall University's Progress Through NAGPRA

Project Abstract

Marshall University’s Progress Through NAGPRA

Jocelyn Taylor

NAGPRA: Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act, Nov 16, 1990. This research paper analyzes the importance, effectiveness, and process of NAGPRA, with hands on research through Marshall University. The paper will record the University’s progress in compliance with NAGPRA in the Spring semester of 2017, while also standing as a written record for the university’s past experiences with the act. The research begins with Dr. Nicholas Freidin, professor of anthropology and archaeology, as the University prepares for a repatriation event on April 17-20, 2017, on campus. The technicalities of the law are addressed and the University’s progress with the steps are explained. During the repatriation event, interviews will be conducted with social scientists and Native American representatives who wish to participate in this research. There will also be interviews with Dr. Freidin and the University’s NAGPRA consultant. I expect to find a similar consensus in response to the interview questions, in that the NAGPRA law is effective, but could still be improved.