Organized Session, Workshop or Roundtable Title

Huntington 101: A Holistic Perspective of Huntington, WV from Past to Present

Participation Type

Organized Session

Participant Type

Multi-presenter

Organized Session, Workshop or Roundtable Abstract

Regardless of where we come from, what can we all learn from a place like Huntington, WV? In this session, analytical works of cross-cultural comparison will provide a holistic picture of Huntington past and present, with an eye to the future. This session is designed to provide contextual evidence of the growth of Huntington as well as to critically examine economics and demographic differences that may affect individual agency and identity. Our shared goal is to provide insight into how change in Huntington has and could affect its population through individual presentations detailing facets of life in the city such as history, the built environment and how this may, in turn, affect the broader social context, the Marshall University classroom, and the possible future of Huntington’s music scene. While our specific research matters differ, we will provide a thorough picture of the City of Huntington and will demonstrate how such a place is observed and potentially changed for the better through applying academic research.

Organizer

Alexis Kastigar

At-A-Glance Bio- Organizer

Alexis Kastigar is an undergraduate student at Marshall University. She is pursuing dual bachelor’s degrees in Anthropology and Latin, as well as Biological Sciences. Her biological research explores the expression levels and patterns of DPY-19L4, a c-mannosyltransferase with observable connections to neural migration, severe male infertility, and bipolar disorder in the other three homologs of DPY-19. DPY-19L4 is relatively unexplored through biochemical isolation, and thus her research is something new and relevant to the scientific world. Her ethnographic research explores the connections between socioeconomic differences and personal expression through built environments, specifically the home. Her research in Latin utilizes grammatical sentence formation to elaborate on ideas of gender and power in ancient literature. Kastigar has presented her biological research at the Marshall University Sigma Xi Research Festival and is scheduled to attend and present at the 2016 Southern Anthropological Society meeting, 2016 American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology conference, the 2016 College of Liberal Arts Conference, and the 2016 NASA S.P.A.C.E. Day.

Type of Session

Paper

Presentation #1 Title

From Industrialism to Tourism: A look at cultural and financial changes in Huntington, West Virginia

Presentation #1 Abstract

This paper examines economic and cultural changes in Huntington, West Virginia from its foundation in 1871 to the present. It produces an overview of social lives of its residents with personal interviews and investigations of front-page headlines of newspapers while comparing censuses and records of highest grossing businesses to prominent industries in 1871, the 1930s through the 1950s, and the 2000s. The heritage of Huntington was shaped by population migration in its early years to important industrial foundations, like railroads and factories. This research exhibits that Huntington had economic booms in its foundation period until a flood in 1937 and another prosperous industrial era during World War II. The adjustment from industrialism to tourism and medical care occurred from the mid-1950s to the present. The analysis of these changes exposes successes and failures of Huntington, which demonstrate potential problems as well as unique opportunities for current city policy makers.

At-A-Glance Bios- Participant #1

Hannah Smith is a Resident Advisor and an anthropology intern under Dr. Brian Hoey at Marshall University. She is planning to receive her B.S. in Biochemistry and Anthropology by May 2018. Her research interests include impact of cultures on the environment. Some research was conducted in the Chesapeake Bay area of Virginia, and more research is to be completed in Huntington, West Virginia. Smith has presented a paper on the state at the West Virginia Young Writer’s Convention. In the near future, she is presenting a paper on the local environment and culture of Huntington at the Southern Anthropological Society’s 51st Conference and hopes to get the paper published.

Presentation #2 Title

Fair Trade as a means to Connect Locals around the World

Presentation #2 Abstract

This paper examines fair trade, a social movement that seeks to promote and provide fair wages for producers in developing countries. More specifically, this study provides an in-depth analysis of the history and future of fair trade practices, with a goal of showing how fair trade is a realistic option for developing an ethical approach to consumption. The paper recounts the author’s personal narrative of discovering realities of current consumerism as well the account of Maria, a young woman working in a South American sweatshop. While Maria’s story is fictional, it is derived from research done on very real practices that characterize working conditions in developing countries around the world. This research also explores availability of fair trade products in Huntington, WV in order to demonstrate how purchasing fair trade products connects “locals” across the world. Increased revenue from fair trade products empowers people in developing countries to invest in their local, which allows for more secure communities across the globe.

At-A-Glance Bios- Participant #2

Heidi Dennison is a third-year undergraduate student in the Communication Disorders Department at Marshall University. She is studying Communication Disorders with hopes of one day receiving her Master’s Degree in Bilingual Speech-Language Pathology. Her research explores the future and history of Fair Trade practices as forms of ethical consumerism. As she continues to research Fair Trade, Dennison hopes to spread awareness about Fair Trade through publications and presentations at conferences.

Presentation #3 Title

The Culture of Socioeconomics: Transforming the House into the Home

Presentation #3 Abstract

This paper is an analytical look at how the effects of socioeconomic status are related to human agency. Specifically, this paper examines how the frequency of personal alterations of a living space’s landscape differs with differences in socioeconomic status. The author highlighted how alterations of the outside living space, such as flags, bird baths, and the size of the outside living space act as outlets for personal expression and agency. The author performed a 10-mile transect from the eastern edge of Marshall University campus in Huntington to Barboursville, West Virginia, making observations of neighborhoods located along said transect. It was found that the higher the apparent socioeconomic status of the neighborhood, the higher likelihood of self-expression, decorative alterations, and greater distance between neighboring houses because the overall rate of home ownership, and thus home agency, was most prevalent in higher income areas. Drawing from the analysis of these observations, this article contributes to the understanding of agency and personal identity in a capitalist society.

At-A-Glance Bios- Participant #3

Alexis Kastigar is an undergraduate student at Marshall University. She is pursuing dual bachelor’s degrees in Anthropology and Latin, as well as Biological Sciences. Her biological research explores the expression levels and patterns of DPY-19L4, a c-mannosyltransferase with observable connections to neural migration, severe male infertility, and bipolar disorder in the other three homologs of DPY-19. DPY-19L4 is relatively unexplored through biochemical isolation, and thus her research is something new and relevant to the scientific world. Her ethnographic research explores the connections between socioeconomic differences and personal expression through built environments, specifically the home. Her research in Latin utilizes grammatical sentence formation to elaborate on ideas of gender and power in ancient literature. Kastigar has presented her biological research at the Marshall University Sigma Xi Research Festival and is scheduled to attend and present at the 2016 Southern Anthropological Society meeting, 2016 American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology conference, the 2016 College of Liberal Arts Conference, and the 2016 NASA S.P.A.C.E. Day.

Presentation #4 Title

Communicative Elements in Two Cultural Anthropology Courses

Presentation #4 Abstract

This paper addresses communication differences between Honor courses and regular courses. More specifically, the author conducted research that focused on two different introductory Anthropology classes by using participate observation methods along with interviews. Data collected showed differences between the two courses often manifested in conversations held such as: difference in out-of-class communication with the professor, frequency of question statements, and counter-productive in-class conversation. The author explored education literature concerning “the class room” and language studies focusing on gender. Preliminary results show that it is possible that the largest difference between honor courses and non-honor courses was gender distribution and class size. The author argues that the regular course sometimes offer a broader range of discussion and better communication efforts due to greater size, diversity, and equal gender distribution. This article contributes to the discussion at Marshall University concerning the way honor courses are managed and promoted, and informs the university as to the underlying effects of the program’s demographics of their more selective Honors College population.

At-A-Glance Bios- Participant #4

Samantha Harvey is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology, and is set to graduate May 2016. Her interests include cultural anthology, linguistic anthropology and women’s studies. Her capstone project combined qualitative and quantitative analysis of referent terms and their implications for female Marshall Students on campus, merging her fields of interest into a semester long study. She presented her findings at the 2015 Research and Creativity Conference at Marshall University. She previously has presented work analyzing the effectiveness of feminist satire in a music video at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the SAS. Samantha is currently working on research on the distinctions between classes offered at Marshall University and hopes to present her findings at the 2016 SAS conference.

Presentation #5 Title

Punks or City Planners? : An ethnographic study in community building through local music scenes

Presentation #5 Abstract

The driving thrust of this study focuses on an ethnographic read of the music scene in Huntington, West Virginia. Over the last ten years, Huntington has lost numerous venues for the local music scene to flourish. Meanwhile, members of the music scene continue to find new places to perform, be it in bars or other means, such as “house shows”. The population of this study focuses primarily on event organizers ranging from “punk house” occupants to bar owners. Time restrictions on this research have dictated a small sample size, however the interviews conducted are reflective of key players in the Huntington area’s small music scene. The goal of this research is to present findings that show how the Huntington music scene is working together, to build not only a much stronger knit scene, but a stronger community in Huntington, West Virginia.

At-A-Glance Bios- Participant #5

Jake Farley is an undergraduate student of Anthropology at Marshall University. He will earn his Bachelor’s degree in Anthropology from Marshall University in 2017. His interests of research vary, but mainly focus on the structure of sub-cultures, including but not limited to youth groups in lower to middle class areas in the United States. Importantly, his interest stems from his experience in what would be considered an “underground” music scene and the environment that develops around it, from D.I.Y. ethics to helping organize communal “punk houses”. Through his research he aspires to bridge a gap between misrepresented youth cultures and cultural norms for the betterment of his community and beyond. He is scheduled to attend as well as present his research at the 2016 Southern Anthropological Society Conference.

Keywords

Agency, Consumerism, Ethnography, higher education, History, Music and Sound

Start Date

4-8-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

4-8-2016 3:00 PM

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Apr 8th, 1:30 PM Apr 8th, 3:00 PM

From Industrialism to Tourism: A look at cultural and financial changes in Huntington, West Virginia

Big Sandy Conference Center - Tech Room 01

This paper examines economic and cultural changes in Huntington, West Virginia from its foundation in 1871 to the present. It produces an overview of social lives of its residents with personal interviews and investigations of front-page headlines of newspapers while comparing censuses and records of highest grossing businesses to prominent industries in 1871, the 1930s through the 1950s, and the 2000s. The heritage of Huntington was shaped by population migration in its early years to important industrial foundations, like railroads and factories. This research exhibits that Huntington had economic booms in its foundation period until a flood in 1937 and another prosperous industrial era during World War II. The adjustment from industrialism to tourism and medical care occurred from the mid-1950s to the present. The analysis of these changes exposes successes and failures of Huntington, which demonstrate potential problems as well as unique opportunities for current city policy makers.