Title

Problematic students of NASP-approved programs: An exploratory study of graduate student views

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-14-2012

Abstract

This study reports the findings of an electronic exploratory survey of National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) Student Representatives. The purpose of the survey was to gather information about the perspective of graduate students concerning problematic peers and their experiences with them in school psychology training programs. Findings suggest that (a) students are unsure whether or not their training programs have an official procedure in place for dealing with problematic students; (b) the problems they observe most commonly involve poor interpersonal skills; (c) consistent with other mental health programs, school psychology graduate students most often talk with their peers or avoid contact with the problematic peer when they have concerns rather than go to faculty; (d) the majority (49.4%) of the respondents feel that faculty or training directors have the most responsibility for the identification of problematic peers but that students have an ethical duty to provide information to the teaching staff if they feel they have a reason to believe there is a problem of which the faculty is unaware.

Comments

This is the final version of the following article: Trimble, L. D., Stroebel, S. S., Krieg, F. J. and Rubenstein, R. L. (2012), Problematic students of NASP-approved programs: An exploratory study of graduate student views. Psychol. Schs.. doi: 10.1002/pits.21619, which has been published at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pits.21619/full

© 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.