Presentation Title

Remembering Sophia Jane

Presenter Information

Sarah A. CanterburyFollow

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

memory, creative nonfiction, Alzheimer's

Biography

Sarah Canterbury is a senior at Marshall University. Her nonfiction essay “The Books I Never Read” was published by The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature, and her nonfiction essay M O V I N G L E T T E R S has been accepted for publication by GNU Journal. Sarah also has an upcoming academic publication with The James Dickey Review. Her braided essay Remembering Sophia Jane is currently entered in the AWP Intro into Journalism Awards and part of a larger nonfiction and memory research project backed by Marshall University’s Undergraduate Creative Discovery Awards.

Major

Creative Writing AND Literary Studies

Advisor for this project

Joel Peckham

Start Date

19-4-2018 10:45 AM

End Date

19-4-2018 12:00 PM

Abstract

Remembering Sophia Jane braids personal narratives and research on the nature of Alzheimer’s, memory, and the role of memory in creative nonfiction, together with personal reflection and active scene. It explores common aspects of the reality of Alzheimer’s as well as the reality facing caregivers. The combination of scene, research, and description work to fill a sort of gap in the genre of the Illness Memoir by reflecting and exploring what the role and authority memory has in storytelling as a whole, and specifically the role in nonfiction work. By redefining the boundaries of Alzheimer’s narratives, illness memoirs, and the crafting processing of creative nonfiction, Remembering Sophia Jane is a nonfiction essay with a message, meaning, and authority on more than disease, but memory, identity, and loss.

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Apr 19th, 10:45 AM Apr 19th, 12:00 PM

Remembering Sophia Jane

Remembering Sophia Jane braids personal narratives and research on the nature of Alzheimer’s, memory, and the role of memory in creative nonfiction, together with personal reflection and active scene. It explores common aspects of the reality of Alzheimer’s as well as the reality facing caregivers. The combination of scene, research, and description work to fill a sort of gap in the genre of the Illness Memoir by reflecting and exploring what the role and authority memory has in storytelling as a whole, and specifically the role in nonfiction work. By redefining the boundaries of Alzheimer’s narratives, illness memoirs, and the crafting processing of creative nonfiction, Remembering Sophia Jane is a nonfiction essay with a message, meaning, and authority on more than disease, but memory, identity, and loss.