Presenter Information

Keyton SampsonFollow

Document Type

Poster Presentation

Keywords

stress, students, clinical floatation, PMR

Biography

My name is Keyton Sampson and I am a senior and psychology major. My interests include clinical psychology, with a focus on abnormal psychology. I enjoy researching and learning about topics that help remove the negative stigma associated with mental illnesses or provide information about subjects that are not commonly discussed.

Major

Psychology

Advisor for this project

Brittany Canady Ph. D.

Start Date

18-4-2019 9:15 AM

End Date

18-4-2019 10:30 AM

Abstract

Clinical Floatation and Perceived Stress in College Students

Clinical floatation has been proposed to address a number of common concerns, such as to relieve stress, recover from injuries, fight addiction, and improve chronic pain. Previous studies have demonstrated that clinical floatation is classified as an emotion-focused coping strategy, reducing blood pressure, cortisol levels, heart rate, and muscle tension (Van Dierendonck & Te Nijenhuis, 2005). The goal of the study is to determine whether clinical floatation benefits perceived stress to a great extent than do traditional interventions or no intervention. It is hypothesized that those partaking in the float sessions will report a larger decrease in stress than those receiving no intervention or a relaxation technique. Participants will be randomly assigned to either a control condition, a 45-minute float session, or a 45-minute progressive muscle relaxation training. All participants will complete the Perceived Stress Scale prior to intervention, immediately following intervention, one week later, and one month later. This research could impact future interventions designed to decrease levels of stress for those with serious stress-related problems.

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Apr 18th, 9:15 AM Apr 18th, 10:30 AM

Clinical Floatation and Perceived Stress in College Students

Clinical Floatation and Perceived Stress in College Students

Clinical floatation has been proposed to address a number of common concerns, such as to relieve stress, recover from injuries, fight addiction, and improve chronic pain. Previous studies have demonstrated that clinical floatation is classified as an emotion-focused coping strategy, reducing blood pressure, cortisol levels, heart rate, and muscle tension (Van Dierendonck & Te Nijenhuis, 2005). The goal of the study is to determine whether clinical floatation benefits perceived stress to a great extent than do traditional interventions or no intervention. It is hypothesized that those partaking in the float sessions will report a larger decrease in stress than those receiving no intervention or a relaxation technique. Participants will be randomly assigned to either a control condition, a 45-minute float session, or a 45-minute progressive muscle relaxation training. All participants will complete the Perceived Stress Scale prior to intervention, immediately following intervention, one week later, and one month later. This research could impact future interventions designed to decrease levels of stress for those with serious stress-related problems.