Presentation Title

Knowledge of Behavioral Principles and Parental Stress of Parents in Incarceration

Document Type

Poster Presentation

Keywords

Knowledge of behavior principles, parental stress, incarceration

Biography

The current study aims to determine if knowledge of behavior principles can predict parental stress in incarcerated parents.

Major

Psychology

Advisor for this project

Jennifer Tiano

Start Date

18-4-2019 9:15 AM

End Date

18-4-2019 10:30 AM

Abstract

Knowledge of Behavior Principles and Parental Stress of Parents in Incarceration

Carter, A., Petrie, E., Holland, T., Tiano, J.

High levels of parental stress have been shown to negatively affect child development and behavior. Behavioral parent training programs, based on behavioral principles, are empirically supported treatments for child externalizing behaviors. Research has shown, that after behavioral parent training, there was a significant decrease in parental stress levels. Many individuals in incarcerated settings are parents and report high levels of parenting stress; however, no research was found examining whether knowledge of behavior principles predict levels of parenting stress with either parents in the general population or in incarcerated settings. The current study aims to determine if knowledge of behavior principles can predict parental stress in incarcerated parents. Eighteen mothers and fathers in a minimum-security prison setting completed the Knowledge of Behavior Principles as Applied to Children-Short Form (KBPAC-SF) and the Parenting Stress Index, Fourth Edition (PSI-4). Results and implications of results will be discussed.

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Apr 18th, 9:15 AM Apr 18th, 10:30 AM

Knowledge of Behavioral Principles and Parental Stress of Parents in Incarceration

Knowledge of Behavior Principles and Parental Stress of Parents in Incarceration

Carter, A., Petrie, E., Holland, T., Tiano, J.

High levels of parental stress have been shown to negatively affect child development and behavior. Behavioral parent training programs, based on behavioral principles, are empirically supported treatments for child externalizing behaviors. Research has shown, that after behavioral parent training, there was a significant decrease in parental stress levels. Many individuals in incarcerated settings are parents and report high levels of parenting stress; however, no research was found examining whether knowledge of behavior principles predict levels of parenting stress with either parents in the general population or in incarcerated settings. The current study aims to determine if knowledge of behavior principles can predict parental stress in incarcerated parents. Eighteen mothers and fathers in a minimum-security prison setting completed the Knowledge of Behavior Principles as Applied to Children-Short Form (KBPAC-SF) and the Parenting Stress Index, Fourth Edition (PSI-4). Results and implications of results will be discussed.