Presentation Title

Mamaw's Dress

Presenter Information

Sophie EzzellFollow

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

Appalachia, Identity, Nonfiction

Biography

Sophie Ezzell is a Tennessee born writer. She has received multiple Maier Writing Awards for her works in fiction and poetry. Her poems and essays have been published or are forthcoming in Still: The Journal, Pidgeonholes, The Dead Mule, and many others. Currently, Sophie is persuing a degree in Creative Writing from Marshall University where she serves as Poetry Editor for Et Cetera.

Major

Creative Writing

Advisor for this project

Dr. Rachael Peckham

Start Date

19-4-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

19-4-2019 12:00 PM

Abstract

"Mamaw's Dress" is a personal essay that explores themes of performance and identity in an Appalachain setting. In this piece, I examine my relationship with my grandmother, specifically our mutual need to suppress our natural selves for fear the other will disapprove. In doing so, I reveal an irony that much of what we feel the need to hide is actually the same. Much of this essay is also a commentary on Appalachian culture. While the essay centers on themes of identity, I also incorporate Appalachia's intricate relationships with class, family, and death. "Mamaw's Dress" speaks to the complex relationships and identities that can be found in the colorful Appalachian landscape.

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Apr 19th, 10:45 AM Apr 19th, 12:00 PM

Mamaw's Dress

"Mamaw's Dress" is a personal essay that explores themes of performance and identity in an Appalachain setting. In this piece, I examine my relationship with my grandmother, specifically our mutual need to suppress our natural selves for fear the other will disapprove. In doing so, I reveal an irony that much of what we feel the need to hide is actually the same. Much of this essay is also a commentary on Appalachian culture. While the essay centers on themes of identity, I also incorporate Appalachia's intricate relationships with class, family, and death. "Mamaw's Dress" speaks to the complex relationships and identities that can be found in the colorful Appalachian landscape.