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Paper

Presentation #1 Title

The Place of Delivery in Late 20th-Century Latin American Homiletics Debates

Presentation #1 Abstract

While scholars understand the late twentieth century as a transformational time for religious, social, and political cultures in Latin America, scholarly attention tends to focus on the relationship between social and theological movements (e.g., liberation theology). However, the existing scholarship has not adequately addressed the issue of how preaching practices and styles shape those social and theological movements. To begin to address this gap, this paper specifically considers the place of delivery in late-twentieth-century Latin American debates about homiletics. The second half of the 20th century saw major changes in the practices of Latin American preaching as Vatican II opened up new opportunities for vernacular preaching in the Catholic church and the explosive growth of evangelicalism, including charismatic movements, transformed both Protestant and Catholic preaching cultures and spread their preference for extemporaneous or impromptu styles of preaching. By closely examining arguments surrounding rhetorical delivery in homiletics debates in late-twentieth-century Latin America, this paper will illuminate the relationship between homiletical practices and styles and the development of theological and social movements.

At-A-Glance Bios- Presenter #1

Emily Murphy Cope is an associate professor of Rhetoric and Writing Studies at York College of Pennsylvania. Her research interests center on rhetorical education and religious rhetorics, specifically the rhetorical education of American evangelicals.

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The Place of Delivery in Late 20th-Century Latin American Homiletics Debates

While scholars understand the late twentieth century as a transformational time for religious, social, and political cultures in Latin America, scholarly attention tends to focus on the relationship between social and theological movements (e.g., liberation theology). However, the existing scholarship has not adequately addressed the issue of how preaching practices and styles shape those social and theological movements. To begin to address this gap, this paper specifically considers the place of delivery in late-twentieth-century Latin American debates about homiletics. The second half of the 20th century saw major changes in the practices of Latin American preaching as Vatican II opened up new opportunities for vernacular preaching in the Catholic church and the explosive growth of evangelicalism, including charismatic movements, transformed both Protestant and Catholic preaching cultures and spread their preference for extemporaneous or impromptu styles of preaching. By closely examining arguments surrounding rhetorical delivery in homiletics debates in late-twentieth-century Latin America, this paper will illuminate the relationship between homiletical practices and styles and the development of theological and social movements.