Participation Type

Paper

About the Presenter

Mark Ward SrFollow

Presentation #1 Title

For Ye Shall Speak into the Air: A Century of the Broadcast Sermon

Presentation #1 Abstract

The presentation reviews the history of religious broadcasting in the United States against changing interpretations of the public interest standard for broadcast licensing; describes how US religious broadcasting is impacted by media economics that favor large networks and programmers; explores religious broadcasting as a media ecology in which believers share rituals to form an interpretive community; and relates the sociology of this community as discourses of US religious broadcasting interact with discourses at the congregational and private levels.

At-A-Glance Bios- Presenter #1

Mark Ward Sr. is Associate Professor of Communication at the University of Houston-Victoria. His research on American evangelical culture and media has been published in four books and more than thirty articles and essays. He is a winner of the Clifford G. Christians Ethics Research Award for The Electronic Church in the Digital Age (Praeger, 2016), David R. Maines Narrative Research Award, Digital Religion Research Award, and multiple Article of the Year awards from the Religious Communication Association. In 2018, he was named his institution’s scholar of the year. His broadcast experience ranges from local religious radio to national syndication.

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For Ye Shall Speak into the Air: A Century of the Broadcast Sermon

The presentation reviews the history of religious broadcasting in the United States against changing interpretations of the public interest standard for broadcast licensing; describes how US religious broadcasting is impacted by media economics that favor large networks and programmers; explores religious broadcasting as a media ecology in which believers share rituals to form an interpretive community; and relates the sociology of this community as discourses of US religious broadcasting interact with discourses at the congregational and private levels.