Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

tornado, El Nino Southern Oscillation. Spatial Distribution

Biography

I am Katarena Jarrell a Geography major with a minor in Meteorology at Marshall University. My passions include the weather, hiking, and being outdoors. I relocated to North Carolina where you can see me roaming the many trails from the mountains to the coast.

Major

Geography

Advisor for this project

Dr. Anita Walz

Start Date

20-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

20-4-2017 2:45 PM

Abstract

El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is an event that is happening in the Pacific Ocean off the west coast of South America. During an ENSO event, there are periods where the water off the coast is unusually warm or unusually cold. When the water temperature changes, it causes the air pressure that is above the water to change. The temperature change affects the weather pattern worldwide and along with it severe weather outbreaks. In a 2008 study by Cook and Schaefer, they mapped historical points for winter outbreaks for the three types of years associated with the ENSO event. These years were the El Nino(EN), La Nina(LN), and Neutral(N) years. In this study, the same method of grouping the tornadoes was used, but it was extended out to the whole year. Line density analysis was used to map the density of tornado touchdowns during EN, LN, and N years. The data shows a distinct spatial distribution pattern of tornado touchdowns during the EN, LN, and N years similar to the one shown in Cook and Schaefer’s study. The distinct pattern found with this can help us predict who may be at a higher risk for tornadoes due to the effects of ENSO.

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Apr 20th, 1:30 PM Apr 20th, 2:45 PM

Does the El Nino Southern Oscillation Play a Role in the Spatial Distribution of Tornadoes in The United States?

El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is an event that is happening in the Pacific Ocean off the west coast of South America. During an ENSO event, there are periods where the water off the coast is unusually warm or unusually cold. When the water temperature changes, it causes the air pressure that is above the water to change. The temperature change affects the weather pattern worldwide and along with it severe weather outbreaks. In a 2008 study by Cook and Schaefer, they mapped historical points for winter outbreaks for the three types of years associated with the ENSO event. These years were the El Nino(EN), La Nina(LN), and Neutral(N) years. In this study, the same method of grouping the tornadoes was used, but it was extended out to the whole year. Line density analysis was used to map the density of tornado touchdowns during EN, LN, and N years. The data shows a distinct spatial distribution pattern of tornado touchdowns during the EN, LN, and N years similar to the one shown in Cook and Schaefer’s study. The distinct pattern found with this can help us predict who may be at a higher risk for tornadoes due to the effects of ENSO.