Presentation Title

How Majority Leader Robert Byrd Saved the Institutional Setting of the Senate

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

Byrd, Senate, Majority

Biography

Andrew Church is a West Virginia native and resident of Parkersburg. Andrew received his Bachelor Degree from West Liberty University in Professional Studies. He is now currently a graduate student at Marshall University in Public Administration. As of now Andrew's primary goals include finishing his course work, as well as complete a respectable internship to expand his professional development. Andrew hopes to land employment for either a non-profit organization, or the federal government.

Major

Public Administration

Advisor for this project

Dr. Damien Arthur

Start Date

20-4-2017 9:15 AM

End Date

20-4-2017 10:30 AM

Abstract

West Virginian Robert Byrd was nominated as the Senate Majority leader for the Democratic Party in 1977. He served as majority leader for two stints during the Carter and Reagan Administrations. Byrd adopted his leadership style from his mentor, Lyndon Johnson, and his predecessor, Mike Mansfield. As a new generation of Senators were beginning to fill seats in congress, this style of leadership became critical for maintaining our Country's traditional and constitutional principles. Byrd especially brought relevance back to the senate at the end of the Carter Administration. According to Corbin (2012), Byrd's leadership moved from eighth place to fifth, in U.S. News and World Report's most influential institutions. Byrd's influence not only helped construct various legislation in domestic and foreign policy, but also maintained checks and balances between the legislative and executive branches. Most specifically during the Reagan Administration. Robert C. Byrd was able to provide a balanced and ethical environment within congress and the White House. This example of leadership occurred prior to his decision upon leaving the majority leadership position, for the chairmanship of the appropriations committee, as a way to help his struggling state. All of which would leave an everlasting legacy for an extraordinary Senator.

majorityleaderbyrd.docx (31 kB)
title page and abstract

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 9:15 AM Apr 20th, 10:30 AM

How Majority Leader Robert Byrd Saved the Institutional Setting of the Senate

West Virginian Robert Byrd was nominated as the Senate Majority leader for the Democratic Party in 1977. He served as majority leader for two stints during the Carter and Reagan Administrations. Byrd adopted his leadership style from his mentor, Lyndon Johnson, and his predecessor, Mike Mansfield. As a new generation of Senators were beginning to fill seats in congress, this style of leadership became critical for maintaining our Country's traditional and constitutional principles. Byrd especially brought relevance back to the senate at the end of the Carter Administration. According to Corbin (2012), Byrd's leadership moved from eighth place to fifth, in U.S. News and World Report's most influential institutions. Byrd's influence not only helped construct various legislation in domestic and foreign policy, but also maintained checks and balances between the legislative and executive branches. Most specifically during the Reagan Administration. Robert C. Byrd was able to provide a balanced and ethical environment within congress and the White House. This example of leadership occurred prior to his decision upon leaving the majority leadership position, for the chairmanship of the appropriations committee, as a way to help his struggling state. All of which would leave an everlasting legacy for an extraordinary Senator.