Presentation Title

Self-Disclosure: Online v. Face-to-Face, Loved Ones v. Strangers

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

self-disclosure, online, communication

Biography

Teagan Anthis is in her last year at Marshall and is expecting to graduate in the Fall of 2017. She is a Communication Studies Major with a Minor in International Affairs. She is hoping to use her skills in Communications to make changes and improvements in the way we clean up our environment, treat animals, treat children, and our veterans.

Major

Communication Studies

Advisor for this project

Dr. Brammer

Start Date

20-4-2017 9:15 AM

End Date

20-4-2017 10:30 AM

Abstract

The purpose of this research to investigate how much a person shares personal details about himself to a family member and/or friend compared to a stranger. It is also to investigate how much of that self-disclosure is done face-to-face compared to online communication.

The children who grew up along with the Internet remember being told, “Don’t talk to strangers on the internet.” Now, those same children and their parents believe everything that is being put up on the Internet to the point that they feel comfortable enough to put personal details about their lives out there to the strangers. The information found online can be recorded and found anywhere. This is in lieu of telling those personal details to other family members or close friends. The hope for this investigation is to figure out how much more personal information is disclosed online than face-to-face.

This presentation will explain my findings after data has been collected from an anonymous online survey.

CMM 478-20, Anthis-Capstone Abstract.docx (140 kB)
Capstone Abstract

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Apr 20th, 9:15 AM Apr 20th, 10:30 AM

Self-Disclosure: Online v. Face-to-Face, Loved Ones v. Strangers

The purpose of this research to investigate how much a person shares personal details about himself to a family member and/or friend compared to a stranger. It is also to investigate how much of that self-disclosure is done face-to-face compared to online communication.

The children who grew up along with the Internet remember being told, “Don’t talk to strangers on the internet.” Now, those same children and their parents believe everything that is being put up on the Internet to the point that they feel comfortable enough to put personal details about their lives out there to the strangers. The information found online can be recorded and found anywhere. This is in lieu of telling those personal details to other family members or close friends. The hope for this investigation is to figure out how much more personal information is disclosed online than face-to-face.

This presentation will explain my findings after data has been collected from an anonymous online survey.