Presentation Title

Gender Identity in V for Vendetta

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

gender, feminist theory, contemporary literature

Biography

My name is Jessica Hutchinson and I am an English literature graduate student at Marshall University. Last year, I participated in the COLA conference as an undergraduate representing the geography department. I obtained my Bachelor's of Arts degree in May 2016 in geography. Currently, I am a graduate assistant at the university writing center. Next fall, I will be teaching English 101 at Marshall as a teaching assistant.

Major

English

Advisor for this project

Dr. Kristin Lillvis

Start Date

20-4-2017 10:45 AM

End Date

20-4-2017 12:00 PM

Abstract

In Alan Moore and David Lloyd’s graphic masterpiece, V for Vendetta, the two protagonists, Evey and V, are subversive to traditional gender roles regarding women. Many conspiracies exist on the true identity of V, but there is no absolute answer. Most assume that V is male, but looking deeper at the context and approach that the novel takes, it seems there is a great possibility that V is female like V's chosen successor, Evey. V’s influence and interaction with Evey throughout the novel is aptly supportive of this argument by means of text and image. Alan Moore and David Lloyd provide progressive representations of women that guide the characters away from female gender norms and expectations and toward a potential that redefines gender expectations in relation to society. Although it may be problematic that V and Evey must hide the fact that they are women to gain authority, it reveals how detrimental appearances can be to women even in this dystopian society. With the Guy Fawkes mask, the anti-hero is able to abstain altogether from gender, which protects V's identity from the negative associations that come with being a woman. In conjunction with a feminist perspective, I argue that V for Vendetta reverses traditional gender roles using texual evidence to support the notion that V is a female anti-hero disguised by a traditionally masculine performance to demand power and authority against the corrupt state.

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Apr 20th, 10:45 AM Apr 20th, 12:00 PM

Gender Identity in V for Vendetta

In Alan Moore and David Lloyd’s graphic masterpiece, V for Vendetta, the two protagonists, Evey and V, are subversive to traditional gender roles regarding women. Many conspiracies exist on the true identity of V, but there is no absolute answer. Most assume that V is male, but looking deeper at the context and approach that the novel takes, it seems there is a great possibility that V is female like V's chosen successor, Evey. V’s influence and interaction with Evey throughout the novel is aptly supportive of this argument by means of text and image. Alan Moore and David Lloyd provide progressive representations of women that guide the characters away from female gender norms and expectations and toward a potential that redefines gender expectations in relation to society. Although it may be problematic that V and Evey must hide the fact that they are women to gain authority, it reveals how detrimental appearances can be to women even in this dystopian society. With the Guy Fawkes mask, the anti-hero is able to abstain altogether from gender, which protects V's identity from the negative associations that come with being a woman. In conjunction with a feminist perspective, I argue that V for Vendetta reverses traditional gender roles using texual evidence to support the notion that V is a female anti-hero disguised by a traditionally masculine performance to demand power and authority against the corrupt state.