Presentation Title

Examining Expertise in the Disciplines: Using Genre Theory to Research How Students Are Asked to Perform Expertise

Presenter Information

Allison L. BraenovichFollow

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

Genre theory, composition and rhetoric, interdisciplinary

Biography

My name is Ali Braenovich and I am a senior English/literary studies major. I am from Fayetteville, West Virginia. I have a deep interest in composition/rhetoric studies and I'm hoping to pursue a masters degree concentrating in this subject.

Major

English/ Literary Studies

Advisor for this project

Kelli Prejean

Start Date

20-4-2017 10:45 AM

End Date

20-4-2017 12:00 PM

Abstract

My research examines how educators ask their students to demonstrate expertise, stance, and citation format in their senior capstone projects. Using genre theory as a guiding lens, I analyze the typical academic genres students are asked to imitate to perform expertise in their chosen discipline. Specifically, I use Michael Carter’s and Mary Soliday’s theoretical frameworks of “genre as social action,” which conceives genre as a fluid concept that changes along with cultural, institutional, and textual norms. My study focuses on the rhetoric used in various disciplines’ capstone syllabi. My goal is see how all disciplines use writing to prove knowledge and to think through what similarities and differences exist in how we talk about writing in the disciplines. My conclusion is that using genre theory to look at writing in multiple disciplines provides a productive framework for helping students better understand academic writing.

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Apr 20th, 10:45 AM Apr 20th, 12:00 PM

Examining Expertise in the Disciplines: Using Genre Theory to Research How Students Are Asked to Perform Expertise

My research examines how educators ask their students to demonstrate expertise, stance, and citation format in their senior capstone projects. Using genre theory as a guiding lens, I analyze the typical academic genres students are asked to imitate to perform expertise in their chosen discipline. Specifically, I use Michael Carter’s and Mary Soliday’s theoretical frameworks of “genre as social action,” which conceives genre as a fluid concept that changes along with cultural, institutional, and textual norms. My study focuses on the rhetoric used in various disciplines’ capstone syllabi. My goal is see how all disciplines use writing to prove knowledge and to think through what similarities and differences exist in how we talk about writing in the disciplines. My conclusion is that using genre theory to look at writing in multiple disciplines provides a productive framework for helping students better understand academic writing.