Start Date

9-11-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

9-11-2017 3:00 PM

Location

Martin Room

Session Description

Librarians know it is a common theme throughout the literature that library instruction does not necessarily leave audiences riveted. Attention can be typically lost early on, and therefore the information we intend to impart never seems to hit its mark. Librarians, therefore, must find a way to be more engaging within their own realm of teaching. We must strive to create active learners within all patron populations, including faculty. One method of engaging faculty, in particular, involves the introduction of Piktocharts in the library classroom. Piktocharts enables the user to create a visual representation of basic information given or used in a classroom setting. In our own library workshop with faculty, attendees are encouraged to create one Piktochart that contains basic library services information as well as specific information about a single database related to their field. This acts as both a means of engaging the faculty member in the learning process directly as well as fostering the creation of handouts that can then be used by faculty personally and within their own classrooms. Faculty are also encouraged to exchange their Piktocharts with colleagues in other departments. Because the Piktocharts are simplistic in nature and meld visual with prose, they are beneficial for a number of learning styles thus making them perfect for students and faculty alike. In addition to a basic presentation on Piktocharts in the library classroom, we will discuss best practices for a similar seminar that both academic and public librarians can use at their own institutions.

Intended Audience

All

Program Format

Other

Program Format - Other

Co-Presentors

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Nov 9th, 2:00 PM Nov 9th, 3:00 PM

Active Learning in Library Instruction: Using Piktocharts to Engage Faculty

Martin Room

Librarians know it is a common theme throughout the literature that library instruction does not necessarily leave audiences riveted. Attention can be typically lost early on, and therefore the information we intend to impart never seems to hit its mark. Librarians, therefore, must find a way to be more engaging within their own realm of teaching. We must strive to create active learners within all patron populations, including faculty. One method of engaging faculty, in particular, involves the introduction of Piktocharts in the library classroom. Piktocharts enables the user to create a visual representation of basic information given or used in a classroom setting. In our own library workshop with faculty, attendees are encouraged to create one Piktochart that contains basic library services information as well as specific information about a single database related to their field. This acts as both a means of engaging the faculty member in the learning process directly as well as fostering the creation of handouts that can then be used by faculty personally and within their own classrooms. Faculty are also encouraged to exchange their Piktocharts with colleagues in other departments. Because the Piktocharts are simplistic in nature and meld visual with prose, they are beneficial for a number of learning styles thus making them perfect for students and faculty alike. In addition to a basic presentation on Piktocharts in the library classroom, we will discuss best practices for a similar seminar that both academic and public librarians can use at their own institutions.