Presentation Title

Child Education and Development in the Huntington Community

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

psychology of women, children, community based learning

Biography

The students in this group are psychology majors in my Community Based Learning, Psychology of Women Capstone Seminar. They would like to present their final project in my course at the COLA Conference.

Major

Psychology

Advisor for this project

Dawn M. Goel

Start Date

19-4-2018 3:30 PM

End Date

19-4-2018 4:45 PM

Abstract

Single-mother households in West Virginia are 46.7% more likely to experience poverty than households with more than one parent or guardian (National Women’s Law Center, 2017). In West Virginia, 68% of children who have parents with less than a high school diploma, live below the poverty threshold (National Center for Children in Poverty, 2015). For 2016, the poverty threshold was set at $24,340 for a family totaling four members including two children. Families that have income less than this are considered “poor” (Talk Poverty, 2017). West Virginia is ranked 48th for “disconnected youth” which is the amount of youth, ages 18 to 24, without high school degrees who were also not currently in school nor working in 2015 (Talk Poverty, 2017). The current project seeks to partner with River Valley Child Development Center to engage children’s minds using after school activities focusing on mindfulness, gender stereotyping, stress relief, and self-esteem building. These activities are designed to help change children’s beliefs about what their futures can hold. An online collection of psychology-related lesson plans will be available for student organizations within the Psychology Department with the hope of the partnership between Marshall University and River Valley Child Development Center being continued in the future.

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Apr 19th, 3:30 PM Apr 19th, 4:45 PM

Child Education and Development in the Huntington Community

Single-mother households in West Virginia are 46.7% more likely to experience poverty than households with more than one parent or guardian (National Women’s Law Center, 2017). In West Virginia, 68% of children who have parents with less than a high school diploma, live below the poverty threshold (National Center for Children in Poverty, 2015). For 2016, the poverty threshold was set at $24,340 for a family totaling four members including two children. Families that have income less than this are considered “poor” (Talk Poverty, 2017). West Virginia is ranked 48th for “disconnected youth” which is the amount of youth, ages 18 to 24, without high school degrees who were also not currently in school nor working in 2015 (Talk Poverty, 2017). The current project seeks to partner with River Valley Child Development Center to engage children’s minds using after school activities focusing on mindfulness, gender stereotyping, stress relief, and self-esteem building. These activities are designed to help change children’s beliefs about what their futures can hold. An online collection of psychology-related lesson plans will be available for student organizations within the Psychology Department with the hope of the partnership between Marshall University and River Valley Child Development Center being continued in the future.