Presentation Title

Helicopter Parenting and College Student Outcomes

Presenter Information

Taylor BurkeFollow

Document Type

Poster Presentation

Keywords

over-parenting, students, outcomes

Biography

I am from Hurricane, WV and I'm a junior at Marshall University. I plan to graduate with a bachelor's degree in Psychology in 2019. Following my graduation, I hope to attend Marshall's Biomedical Sciences masters program.

Major

Psychology

Advisor for this project

Dr. Melissa Atkins

Start Date

20-4-2018 11:15 AM

End Date

20-4-2018 12:15 PM

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the academic success and demographic characteristics of college students with over-involved parents. Several studies have shown that the effects of helicopter parenting may hinder a student’s academic performance. Locke, Campbell, & Kavanagh (2012) concluded that helicopter parents fail to promote autonomy, exert an abnormal amount of control on their children’s lives, and provide excessive supervision. Helicopter parenting can lead to a decrease in general well-being, which can negatively affect the academic performance of college students (Darlow, et al., 2017). Also, over-reliance on parents can cause procrastination in students (Hong, et al., 2015). Schiffrin (2017) made a similar point, stating that excessive help from parents can decrease intrinsic motivation and hinder academic outcomes. The current study will further examine these effects in college students, while also examining demographic factors associated with helicopter parenting.

This study is an online anonymous survey. We have collected data from 60 participants, and hope to have at least 40 more. Academic success is measured with several items created to give a more expanded and accurate representation than GPA alone. Helicopter parenting is measured with the 15-item Helicopter Parenting Behavior Scale (Schiffrin, et al., 2014). Finally, several basic demographic questions are asked.

It is hypothesized that helicopter parenting will be related to decreased academic success. Helicopter parenting will be more prevalent among students living at home, but its effect on academic success will be more evident in students living away from home.

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Apr 20th, 11:15 AM Apr 20th, 12:15 PM

Helicopter Parenting and College Student Outcomes

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the academic success and demographic characteristics of college students with over-involved parents. Several studies have shown that the effects of helicopter parenting may hinder a student’s academic performance. Locke, Campbell, & Kavanagh (2012) concluded that helicopter parents fail to promote autonomy, exert an abnormal amount of control on their children’s lives, and provide excessive supervision. Helicopter parenting can lead to a decrease in general well-being, which can negatively affect the academic performance of college students (Darlow, et al., 2017). Also, over-reliance on parents can cause procrastination in students (Hong, et al., 2015). Schiffrin (2017) made a similar point, stating that excessive help from parents can decrease intrinsic motivation and hinder academic outcomes. The current study will further examine these effects in college students, while also examining demographic factors associated with helicopter parenting.

This study is an online anonymous survey. We have collected data from 60 participants, and hope to have at least 40 more. Academic success is measured with several items created to give a more expanded and accurate representation than GPA alone. Helicopter parenting is measured with the 15-item Helicopter Parenting Behavior Scale (Schiffrin, et al., 2014). Finally, several basic demographic questions are asked.

It is hypothesized that helicopter parenting will be related to decreased academic success. Helicopter parenting will be more prevalent among students living at home, but its effect on academic success will be more evident in students living away from home.