Presentation Title

Queering Relationships

Presenter Information

Ian ClarkFollow

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

Polyamory, Relationships, LGBTQ

Biography

Ian Clark is a senior undergraduate sociology student, with minors in Latin and sexuality studies. His areas of interest include gender and sexuality, especially those identities and expressions outside of the cisgender, heterosexual norm.

Major

Sociology

Advisor for this project

Marty Laubach

Start Date

18-4-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

18-4-2019 12:00 PM

Abstract

More research exists on LGBTQ+ populations than ever before, and research has been done on people in polyamorous relationships, but very little research exists on LGBTQ+ people and the way their sexuality/ gender identities influence their relationship dynamics (if they do at all). The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a link between sexuality and gender identity and an individual’s likelihood to pursue non-monogamous or polyamorous relationship dynamics. Participants were recruited through word of mouth and from online forums. The participants fully consented either online or in person for the survey or interview process, respectively. The interviews consisted of questions regarding sexual orientation, understanding of non-monogamous relationships, and attitudes/ experiences surrounding monogamy and non-monogamy. The results of the study indicate that LGB+ sexuality, rather than non-cis gender identity, was more closely related to participation in non-monogamous or polyamorous relationship dynamic and that LGBTQ+ people are unlikely to perceive the stigma surrounding polyamory as being the same severity as the stigma surrounding LGBTQ+ folks.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 18th, 10:45 AM Apr 18th, 12:00 PM

Queering Relationships

More research exists on LGBTQ+ populations than ever before, and research has been done on people in polyamorous relationships, but very little research exists on LGBTQ+ people and the way their sexuality/ gender identities influence their relationship dynamics (if they do at all). The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a link between sexuality and gender identity and an individual’s likelihood to pursue non-monogamous or polyamorous relationship dynamics. Participants were recruited through word of mouth and from online forums. The participants fully consented either online or in person for the survey or interview process, respectively. The interviews consisted of questions regarding sexual orientation, understanding of non-monogamous relationships, and attitudes/ experiences surrounding monogamy and non-monogamy. The results of the study indicate that LGB+ sexuality, rather than non-cis gender identity, was more closely related to participation in non-monogamous or polyamorous relationship dynamic and that LGBTQ+ people are unlikely to perceive the stigma surrounding polyamory as being the same severity as the stigma surrounding LGBTQ+ folks.