Presentation Title

Etiology of Schizophrenia

Presenter Information

sherri danielsFollow

Document Type

Poster Presentation

Keywords

Sherri, Ashley, Daniels

Biography

I am a Junior with a psychology major at Marshall University. I am from Washington, D.C. and I also have a passion for acting. In my coming of age I've always wanted to contribute to the mental health community and make an impact in psychology. I plan on doing a Masters program in psychology and other internships that will make a huge impact in my career goals. I am very excited to present at this cola conference based on my research.

Major

Psychology

Advisor for this project

Dr. Koontz

Start Date

18-4-2019 9:15 AM

End Date

18-4-2019 10:30 AM

Abstract

This literature review examines the biological and environmental risk factors in the etiology of schizophrenia. A well-researched theoretical framework behind the etiology of schizophrenia is the dopamine hypothesis which states the elevated levels of the brain chemical dopamine can contribute to the development of schizophrenia. Research has also shown genetic predispositions and obstetrical complications may contribute to the development of schizophrenia. The diathesis-stress model describes the heightened cortisol releasing the potential to intensify schizophrenia symptoms while amplifying dopamine activity in the environment. More recent findings show that genetics influences act in cohesion with environmental factors. Based upon the findings of this literature review; genetics, prenatal and postnatal factors, brain abnormalities, and environmental factors all have an impact on the etiology of schizophrenia. Further research should focus on how biological and environmental factors impact the etiology of schizophrenia to aid in better understanding of the illness’s development.

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Apr 18th, 9:15 AM Apr 18th, 10:30 AM

Etiology of Schizophrenia

This literature review examines the biological and environmental risk factors in the etiology of schizophrenia. A well-researched theoretical framework behind the etiology of schizophrenia is the dopamine hypothesis which states the elevated levels of the brain chemical dopamine can contribute to the development of schizophrenia. Research has also shown genetic predispositions and obstetrical complications may contribute to the development of schizophrenia. The diathesis-stress model describes the heightened cortisol releasing the potential to intensify schizophrenia symptoms while amplifying dopamine activity in the environment. More recent findings show that genetics influences act in cohesion with environmental factors. Based upon the findings of this literature review; genetics, prenatal and postnatal factors, brain abnormalities, and environmental factors all have an impact on the etiology of schizophrenia. Further research should focus on how biological and environmental factors impact the etiology of schizophrenia to aid in better understanding of the illness’s development.