Presenter Information

Edris AkersFollow

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

feminism, mythology, Japan

Biography

Edris Akers is from Princeton, WV and a senior in the Japanese Program with a minor in Philosophy.

Major

Japanese

Advisor for this project

Dr. Zelideth Rivas

Start Date

19-4-2019 9:15 AM

End Date

19-4-2019 10:30 AM

Abstract

In the early 1900s of Japan, Hiratsuka Raicho started a journal called Bluestocking. In its early years, it focused on women’s literature. Soon after, the focus of the journal shifted to women’s issues. In one of the first issues, Raicho made reference to Japan’s creation myths in an attempt to stress the suppression of women’s rights in Japan. Raicho’s dialog regarding women’s reproductive health stirred innumerable conversations within the community. Through her poetry she made clear her own feelings on women’s rights of the time period. I will introduce the ode to mythology in feminism in Japan in the 1920s by analyzing Raicho’s “In the Beginning, Woman was the Sun”. Through this analysis, I will attempt to determine the meaning behind Hiratsuka Raicho’s use of mythology, specifically Amaterasu, as an expressive tone for feminism.

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Apr 19th, 9:15 AM Apr 19th, 10:30 AM

Feminism and Mythology: Hiratsuka Raicho and Japanese Feminism

In the early 1900s of Japan, Hiratsuka Raicho started a journal called Bluestocking. In its early years, it focused on women’s literature. Soon after, the focus of the journal shifted to women’s issues. In one of the first issues, Raicho made reference to Japan’s creation myths in an attempt to stress the suppression of women’s rights in Japan. Raicho’s dialog regarding women’s reproductive health stirred innumerable conversations within the community. Through her poetry she made clear her own feelings on women’s rights of the time period. I will introduce the ode to mythology in feminism in Japan in the 1920s by analyzing Raicho’s “In the Beginning, Woman was the Sun”. Through this analysis, I will attempt to determine the meaning behind Hiratsuka Raicho’s use of mythology, specifically Amaterasu, as an expressive tone for feminism.