Presentation Title

Art of Attraction: Qualities and Traits We Find Attractive

Document Type

Poster Presentation

Keywords

attraction, gender, traits, sexuality

Biography

Jeffrey Conaway is a senior at Marshall University pursuing a bachelors degree in Psychology. Jessica Lane is a junior at Marshall University pursuing bachelors degrees in Psychology and Spanish. The pair completed this research while studying under Dr. Christopher LeGrow in Fall 2018.

Major

Psychology

Advisor for this project

Dr. Christopher LeGrow

Start Date

19-4-2019 9:15 AM

End Date

19-4-2019 10:30 AM

Abstract

The purpose of the research study was to examine the physical qualities and personality traits that are important to male and female college students when determining whether they find someone attractive. Original beliefs led that we would find a skew in male data towards traits in females that most relate to those traditionally related to homemakers whereas the female data would lean more towards emotionally supportive traits. As far as physicality, we expected to find a rather divided front between men and women in what they most liked in people.

A survey was posted in the Marshall University SONA server for the Psychology Department’s Human Subjects Pool to take part for approximately one month over which time 76 responses were gathered. The data gathered, while agreeing with the general emotional traits we expected, had a far more varied response when relating to the physical traits people are most attracted.

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Apr 19th, 9:15 AM Apr 19th, 10:30 AM

Art of Attraction: Qualities and Traits We Find Attractive

The purpose of the research study was to examine the physical qualities and personality traits that are important to male and female college students when determining whether they find someone attractive. Original beliefs led that we would find a skew in male data towards traits in females that most relate to those traditionally related to homemakers whereas the female data would lean more towards emotionally supportive traits. As far as physicality, we expected to find a rather divided front between men and women in what they most liked in people.

A survey was posted in the Marshall University SONA server for the Psychology Department’s Human Subjects Pool to take part for approximately one month over which time 76 responses were gathered. The data gathered, while agreeing with the general emotional traits we expected, had a far more varied response when relating to the physical traits people are most attracted.