Presenter Information

Adriana CookFollow

Document Type

Poster Presentation

Keywords

Eating Disorder, Bulimia, Anorexia, Minority, Stereotype

Biography

My name is Adriana Cook, I am 22 years old and currently a Senior at Marshall University. I am majoring in Psychology, and I am in the AMD Program. I hope to continue my education in the Clinical Masters Program at Marshall University, and my goal is to work one on one with individuals in a clinical setting that focuses mostly on depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and drug use.

Major

Psychology

Advisor for this project

Professor Dawn Goel

Start Date

19-4-2019 9:15 AM

End Date

19-4-2019 10:30 AM

Abstract

There are prevalent disparities among men and minority patients in the diagnosis and treatment of eating disorders based on certain stereotypes. These stereotypes are often recognized as affecting only thin, Caucasian women. According to The National Eating Disorder Association, this specific stereotype leads to health disparities and stigma among men, average and overweight individuals, and racial minorities. Consequently, these individuals often feel stigmatized for not fitting the stereotype and they are less likely to undergo treatment (Becker et al., 2003). When compared to men, women are almost 1.5 times more likely to get full recommended treatment (Sonneville & Lipson, 2018). Anorexia is 73% more likely to be diagnosed than binge eating disorder (Sonneville & Lipson, 2018), although the prevalence of anorexia is relatively similar to binge eating. This could be due to individuals suffering from anorexia having a much lower body weight than individuals with binge eating disorder, which fits the aforementioned stereotype. In working to reduce the use of stereotypes in the treatment of eating disorders, healthcare professionals should be trained to recognize the use of bias and stereotypes in the decision-making process when it comes to diagnosing eating disorders and recommending treatment options. Furthermore, as a society, we must increase awareness of the stereotypes surrounding eating disorders so that diagnosis and treatment become accessible for all individuals regardless of their race, ethnicity, gender, and/or body habitus.

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Apr 19th, 9:15 AM Apr 19th, 10:30 AM

Bias Towards Men and Minority Patients with Eating Disorders

There are prevalent disparities among men and minority patients in the diagnosis and treatment of eating disorders based on certain stereotypes. These stereotypes are often recognized as affecting only thin, Caucasian women. According to The National Eating Disorder Association, this specific stereotype leads to health disparities and stigma among men, average and overweight individuals, and racial minorities. Consequently, these individuals often feel stigmatized for not fitting the stereotype and they are less likely to undergo treatment (Becker et al., 2003). When compared to men, women are almost 1.5 times more likely to get full recommended treatment (Sonneville & Lipson, 2018). Anorexia is 73% more likely to be diagnosed than binge eating disorder (Sonneville & Lipson, 2018), although the prevalence of anorexia is relatively similar to binge eating. This could be due to individuals suffering from anorexia having a much lower body weight than individuals with binge eating disorder, which fits the aforementioned stereotype. In working to reduce the use of stereotypes in the treatment of eating disorders, healthcare professionals should be trained to recognize the use of bias and stereotypes in the decision-making process when it comes to diagnosing eating disorders and recommending treatment options. Furthermore, as a society, we must increase awareness of the stereotypes surrounding eating disorders so that diagnosis and treatment become accessible for all individuals regardless of their race, ethnicity, gender, and/or body habitus.