Presentation Title

How Effective are the Conventional Methods of Predicting Multiple Sclerosis in Appalachia?

Presenter Information

Ian EnglishFollow

Document Type

Poster Presentation

Keywords

Health, M.S., Appalachia

Biography

I'm a senior B.S. Geography Major at Marshall. I work as an Active Duty Analyst with the West Virginia National Guard. Following graduation, my aim is to work as either a private contractor or civilian employee for the federal government.

Major

Geography

Advisor for this project

Dr. Kozar

Start Date

19-4-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

19-4-2019 3:15 PM

Abstract

Multiple Sclerosis (M.S.) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects approximately 400,000 Americans, or roughly 8% of Americans suffering from a neurodegenerative condition. This research reviews commonly accepted risk factors in the development of M.S., how well the risk factors aid prediction of M.S. in the contiguous United States, and how well the risk factors aid prediction of M.S. in Appalachia. The most commonly accepted factor, the Latitude Gradient, is the most accurate but other commonly accepted factors such as the smoking rate tend to vary in accuracy when analyzing M.S. in the Appalachian Region.

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Apr 19th, 2:00 PM Apr 19th, 3:15 PM

How Effective are the Conventional Methods of Predicting Multiple Sclerosis in Appalachia?

Multiple Sclerosis (M.S.) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects approximately 400,000 Americans, or roughly 8% of Americans suffering from a neurodegenerative condition. This research reviews commonly accepted risk factors in the development of M.S., how well the risk factors aid prediction of M.S. in the contiguous United States, and how well the risk factors aid prediction of M.S. in Appalachia. The most commonly accepted factor, the Latitude Gradient, is the most accurate but other commonly accepted factors such as the smoking rate tend to vary in accuracy when analyzing M.S. in the Appalachian Region.