Presentation Title

Lost in the Fray of War: Consumption and Destruction in Lucan's Pharsalia

Presenter Information

Mary Anna BallFollow

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

classics, civil war, Lucan

Biography

Mary Anna Ball is a Humanities: Classics and Latin senior with a minor in Ancient Greek. Along with her academic pursuits, she is a soloist with the Charleston Ballet and the associate producer of the documentary Andre Van Damme & the Story of the Charleston Ballet, which has been featured at film festivals across the U.S. and Canada.

Major

Humanities: Classics, Latin

Advisor for this project

Dr. Christina Franzen

Start Date

19-4-2019 3:30 PM

End Date

19-4-2019 4:45 PM

Abstract

In Lucan's Pharsalia, standard boundaries of space, agency, and time have been destroyed in the fray of civil war by means of an all-encompassing consumption, noted by the Latin verb "consumere." With the use of "consumere" throughout the epic, Lucan is able to expand the sense of destruction of battle to new limits which had not been seen before. Through his poetic language and exaggerated horror, Lucan is able to present a Rome so affected by the civil war that all aspects of Roman Empire and society have been consumed, and I aim to show that this extent of consumption has passed through time and continued on through Roman history and future, especially in regard to the formation of the Julio-Claudian reign.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 19th, 3:30 PM Apr 19th, 4:45 PM

Lost in the Fray of War: Consumption and Destruction in Lucan's Pharsalia

In Lucan's Pharsalia, standard boundaries of space, agency, and time have been destroyed in the fray of civil war by means of an all-encompassing consumption, noted by the Latin verb "consumere." With the use of "consumere" throughout the epic, Lucan is able to expand the sense of destruction of battle to new limits which had not been seen before. Through his poetic language and exaggerated horror, Lucan is able to present a Rome so affected by the civil war that all aspects of Roman Empire and society have been consumed, and I aim to show that this extent of consumption has passed through time and continued on through Roman history and future, especially in regard to the formation of the Julio-Claudian reign.