Presentation Title

Variables Affecting the Intensity of Atlantic Hurricanes

Presenter Information

Hunter EllisonFollow

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

Hurricane, intensity, weather

Biography

I am a Senior Geography major with an emphasis in weather broadcasting. I look forward to the conference and graduating in May.

Major

Geography

Advisor for this project

Dr. Jonathan Kozar

Start Date

19-4-2019 3:30 PM

End Date

19-4-2019 4:45 PM

Abstract

Variables Affecting the Intensity of Atlantic Hurricanes

Hurricanes are large, destructive storms that affect millions of people every season. They are infamously unpredictable, as there are so many factors that can influence how strong the storm becomes. The purpose of my project was to determine the influencing factors on the intensity of hurricanes. This research investigated 14 hurricanes for the 2005 Atlantic season, using sea surface temperatures, tropical cyclone heat potential, and central pressure as independent variables with the wind speed as the dependent. Research suggests that sea surface temperatures and tropical cyclone heat potential will have a positive correlation with wind speed because they found that the water temperature can affect both the heat potential of the water and the storm itself. Also, a negative correlation between central pressure and wind speed has been identified because weather phenomena show that lower pressures in storm systems tend to lead to stronger systems. Results indicate strong negative correlations exist between wind speed and air pressure while weak to moderate negative correlations dominate both sea surface temperatures and tropical cyclone heat potential, although variability across all the correlations were greater than expected.

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Apr 19th, 3:30 PM Apr 19th, 4:45 PM

Variables Affecting the Intensity of Atlantic Hurricanes

Variables Affecting the Intensity of Atlantic Hurricanes

Hurricanes are large, destructive storms that affect millions of people every season. They are infamously unpredictable, as there are so many factors that can influence how strong the storm becomes. The purpose of my project was to determine the influencing factors on the intensity of hurricanes. This research investigated 14 hurricanes for the 2005 Atlantic season, using sea surface temperatures, tropical cyclone heat potential, and central pressure as independent variables with the wind speed as the dependent. Research suggests that sea surface temperatures and tropical cyclone heat potential will have a positive correlation with wind speed because they found that the water temperature can affect both the heat potential of the water and the storm itself. Also, a negative correlation between central pressure and wind speed has been identified because weather phenomena show that lower pressures in storm systems tend to lead to stronger systems. Results indicate strong negative correlations exist between wind speed and air pressure while weak to moderate negative correlations dominate both sea surface temperatures and tropical cyclone heat potential, although variability across all the correlations were greater than expected.