Presentation Title

Title IX: Mandatory Reporting and Its Effects on the Sexual Assault Reporting Process

Presenter Information

Victoria Bostic

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

Sexual Assault, Mandatory Reporting, Title IX, Agency, Autonomy, Consent

Biography

Victoria Bostic is a spreadsheet-loving twenty-something with a penchant for taking her time. This capstone is her 5th year in the endeavor to get that B.A at the end of her name. She has been interested in the topic of the Title IX sexual assault reporting process since being a Resident Assistant at West Virginia University in 2017. She enjoys existing in general and spending time with her cats and partner.

Major

Sociology

Advisor for this project

Kristi Fondren

Start Date

22-4-2021 10:45 AM

Abstract

This study is the Capstone Research Project that in part will satisfy the requirements of graduation within the Marshall University Department of Sociology and Anthropology. The goal of the study is to define the intended usages of mandatory reporting within the sexual assault reporting process, investigate how sexual assault cases are coordinated, and consider the received effects of mandatory reporting upon Marshall University’s students. While there have been studies done on mandatory reporting as an act, an isolated part of the sexual assault reporting process, there remains a lack of consideration for the relationship between the administration enacting policies that include mandatory reporters as well as the relationship between mandatory reporters and those they are reporting. This study will use the guidance of these previous studies to provide a holistic context while keeping to the original goal of the study in its own right.

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Apr 22nd, 10:45 AM

Title IX: Mandatory Reporting and Its Effects on the Sexual Assault Reporting Process

This study is the Capstone Research Project that in part will satisfy the requirements of graduation within the Marshall University Department of Sociology and Anthropology. The goal of the study is to define the intended usages of mandatory reporting within the sexual assault reporting process, investigate how sexual assault cases are coordinated, and consider the received effects of mandatory reporting upon Marshall University’s students. While there have been studies done on mandatory reporting as an act, an isolated part of the sexual assault reporting process, there remains a lack of consideration for the relationship between the administration enacting policies that include mandatory reporters as well as the relationship between mandatory reporters and those they are reporting. This study will use the guidance of these previous studies to provide a holistic context while keeping to the original goal of the study in its own right.