Presentation Title

Reclaiming Wonder: A Hauntological Analysis of Stalker

Presenter Information

James Michael HoyleFollow

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

Stalker, Analysis, Derrida

Biography

James Hoyle earned a Master's Degree in Journalism (2019) from Marshall University. He is currently a graduate student in the Department of English.

Major

English

Advisor for this project

John Young

Start Date

23-4-2021 10:45 AM

Abstract

The 1970s was a turbulent time for the Soviet Union. The economic prosperity promised by the October Revolution had not materialized, and people were questioning is there was any point to all the suffering of the first half of the twentieth century. These existential anxieties are what filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky addresses in his 1979 film Stalker. Analyzing the film’s composition and symbolism through the lens of Derrida’s theory of hauntology, along with the history of Russia, reveals that Stalker is one of the most subversive statements on faith to be made by a culture that actively wanted to end faith.

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Apr 23rd, 10:45 AM

Reclaiming Wonder: A Hauntological Analysis of Stalker

The 1970s was a turbulent time for the Soviet Union. The economic prosperity promised by the October Revolution had not materialized, and people were questioning is there was any point to all the suffering of the first half of the twentieth century. These existential anxieties are what filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky addresses in his 1979 film Stalker. Analyzing the film’s composition and symbolism through the lens of Derrida’s theory of hauntology, along with the history of Russia, reveals that Stalker is one of the most subversive statements on faith to be made by a culture that actively wanted to end faith.