Presentation Title

The Haruko Obokata Incident: Korean and Japanese Scientific Research Ethics

Presenter Information

David WilliamsFollow

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

Japanese, Haruko Obokata, Scientific research ethics, Asian science curriculum, STAP (stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency

Biography

Born in a small town in West Virginia, David Williams grew up in a humble home. Once he found his passion for languages and science he vowed to help those in need throughout the world. He now studies biology, mathematics, chemistry, and Japanese at Marshall University and aspires to continue his studies at Chukyo University in Japan.

Major

Japanese, biology

Advisor for this project

Natsuki Anderson

Start Date

20-4-2018 10:45 AM

End Date

20-4-2018 12:00 PM

Abstract

In this project I will discuss how the impact of the Haruko Obokata incident changed the scientific world in Japan. Her falsifying data from an experiment to acquire pluripotency by way of stimuli. Her scientific misconduct could have been caused by a desire for a Nobel Prize, or it could've been a misunderstanding. The three main reasons for the reaction include: falsifying data in one of the biggest scientific journals in the world multiple times, being a woman in a male dominated field, and not showing humility when she was proven a fraud. After she was proved to have submitted fraudulent data, the scientific community in both Korea and Japan changed in various ways to stop academic dishonesty. The Japanese scientific community wants to implement ethics education-based curriculum for students aspiring to be scientists, while the Korean Ministry of Education concretized research ethics regulations and implemented stricter punishments for those found to have been dishonest.

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Apr 20th, 10:45 AM Apr 20th, 12:00 PM

The Haruko Obokata Incident: Korean and Japanese Scientific Research Ethics

In this project I will discuss how the impact of the Haruko Obokata incident changed the scientific world in Japan. Her falsifying data from an experiment to acquire pluripotency by way of stimuli. Her scientific misconduct could have been caused by a desire for a Nobel Prize, or it could've been a misunderstanding. The three main reasons for the reaction include: falsifying data in one of the biggest scientific journals in the world multiple times, being a woman in a male dominated field, and not showing humility when she was proven a fraud. After she was proved to have submitted fraudulent data, the scientific community in both Korea and Japan changed in various ways to stop academic dishonesty. The Japanese scientific community wants to implement ethics education-based curriculum for students aspiring to be scientists, while the Korean Ministry of Education concretized research ethics regulations and implemented stricter punishments for those found to have been dishonest.