Presenter Information

Justin GibsonFollow

Document Type

Poster Presentation

Keywords

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy, Behavioral Parent Training, acceptability, socio-economic status

Biography

My name is Justin Gibson and I am a senior psychology major. I plan on getting my PhD in clinical psychology after undergraduate studies. I am currently in a research lab with Dr. Tiano and independent study with Dr. Day-Brown. I hope to implement the knowledge learned from the process of creating this project along with the conference presentation to prepare myself for graduate school.

Major

Psychology

Advisor for this project

Dr. Jennifer Tiano

Start Date

20-4-2018 11:15 AM

End Date

20-4-2018 12:15 PM

Abstract

Examining Parent Training Acceptability Among High and Low-Income Undergraduates

Gibson, J., Johnson, C., Hunter, A., Tiano, J.

Approximately 6% of parents report that their 4-17 year-old children exhibit behavioral or emotional difficulties. Across levels of socio-economic status (SES), behavior problems are generally more common among children from low SES backgrounds. When Behavioral Parent Training (BPT) programs are available to this population, acceptance and attendance rates are low, as well as adherence. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an effective BPT for parents and children between the ages of 2 and 7 with significant behavior problems. However, acceptability of PCIT has not been widely researched. One study found that low-income parents rate some components of PCIT as acceptable, but report low acceptability of PCIT overall. Even though young adults may be in caregiving roles, no studies were found examining acceptability of PCIT with nonparental caregivers. This study compared PCIT acceptability among high and low-income undergraduate psychology majors. Six hundred two psychology undergraduate students completed an online assessment of child behavior and PCIT acceptability. Results indicate that there was not a significant difference in students’ income level and PCIT acceptability, F (1,411) = .017 , p = .897.

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Apr 20th, 11:15 AM Apr 20th, 12:15 PM

Examining Parent Training Acceptability Among High and Low-Income Undergraduates

Examining Parent Training Acceptability Among High and Low-Income Undergraduates

Gibson, J., Johnson, C., Hunter, A., Tiano, J.

Approximately 6% of parents report that their 4-17 year-old children exhibit behavioral or emotional difficulties. Across levels of socio-economic status (SES), behavior problems are generally more common among children from low SES backgrounds. When Behavioral Parent Training (BPT) programs are available to this population, acceptance and attendance rates are low, as well as adherence. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an effective BPT for parents and children between the ages of 2 and 7 with significant behavior problems. However, acceptability of PCIT has not been widely researched. One study found that low-income parents rate some components of PCIT as acceptable, but report low acceptability of PCIT overall. Even though young adults may be in caregiving roles, no studies were found examining acceptability of PCIT with nonparental caregivers. This study compared PCIT acceptability among high and low-income undergraduate psychology majors. Six hundred two psychology undergraduate students completed an online assessment of child behavior and PCIT acceptability. Results indicate that there was not a significant difference in students’ income level and PCIT acceptability, F (1,411) = .017 , p = .897.