Presentation Title

Graeco-Egyptian Papyrology

Presenter Information

Michelle YoungFollow

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

Papyrus, Byzantine, Marshall

Biography

Michelle Young is a student at Marshall University pursuing a bachelor's degree in anthropology with an emphasis on Archaeology.

Major

Anthropology

Advisor for this project

Nicholas Freidin

Start Date

18-4-2019 3:30 PM

End Date

18-4-2019 4:45 PM

Abstract

This research examines a Graeco-Egyptian papyrus in the MU ethnographic collection. The research involved a personal visit to the University of Cincinnati where the manuscript was authenticated, restored, and translated by Dr. Peter Van Minnen. Dated to ca. the 5th Century of the early Byzantine Period, this papyrus originated in the Herakleopolite nome of Egypt, an area which was under the control of Constantinople. This capstone is an endeavor to provide a contextual background, both the economic and social characteristics of the community, as well as the political world at the time. The manuscript provides a list of names, the taxes paid, and in some cases, their profession. A glimpse into the life of a small community over 1,500 years ago. Following the curation and research of the papyrus, Marshall University is now able to display this unique artifact for the benefit of faculty and students and will be available for researchers worldwide.

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Apr 18th, 3:30 PM Apr 18th, 4:45 PM

Graeco-Egyptian Papyrology

This research examines a Graeco-Egyptian papyrus in the MU ethnographic collection. The research involved a personal visit to the University of Cincinnati where the manuscript was authenticated, restored, and translated by Dr. Peter Van Minnen. Dated to ca. the 5th Century of the early Byzantine Period, this papyrus originated in the Herakleopolite nome of Egypt, an area which was under the control of Constantinople. This capstone is an endeavor to provide a contextual background, both the economic and social characteristics of the community, as well as the political world at the time. The manuscript provides a list of names, the taxes paid, and in some cases, their profession. A glimpse into the life of a small community over 1,500 years ago. Following the curation and research of the papyrus, Marshall University is now able to display this unique artifact for the benefit of faculty and students and will be available for researchers worldwide.