Presentation Title

Black Sheep Effect in College Students

Presenter Information

Rachel Lykins SharpFollow

Document Type

Panel Presentation

Keywords

Black Sheep Effect, Big Five Personality Traits, Loneliness

Biography

Rachel Lykins Sharp is a senior Communication Studies major, minoring in French, Theatre, and Dance. She is an active member of the Phi Kappa Phi honors society, wherein she serves as student Vice President. During her time at Marshall University, she also served as Vice President of the French Club, as a member of the Honors College Steering Committee, and as a member of the MU Dance Theatre.

Major

Communication Studies

Advisor for this project

Cam Brammer

Start Date

22-4-2021 2:00 PM

Abstract

Studies show that ingroups hold a distinct set of expectations for their members. When an individual deviates from these expectations, the identity of the group is threatened and members then move to either remove or cover up the threat. Although much research exists on how the occurrence of the black sheep effect may be impacted by external factors (ex. race, socioeconomic status), presently no research exists on how internal factors determine its existence. This study explores the black sheep effect through the lens of the Big Five personality traits, specifically analyzing it among college students in their families.

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Apr 22nd, 2:00 PM

Black Sheep Effect in College Students

Studies show that ingroups hold a distinct set of expectations for their members. When an individual deviates from these expectations, the identity of the group is threatened and members then move to either remove or cover up the threat. Although much research exists on how the occurrence of the black sheep effect may be impacted by external factors (ex. race, socioeconomic status), presently no research exists on how internal factors determine its existence. This study explores the black sheep effect through the lens of the Big Five personality traits, specifically analyzing it among college students in their families.