Presenter Information

Abigail HunterFollow

Document Type

Poster Presentation

Keywords

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy, Behavioral Parent Training, acceptability, rural, urban, nonparents

Biography

My name is Abigail Hunter. I am a senior psychology major. I am currently working with Dr. Tiano in her research lab to gain more skills that I will utilize to be successful in graduate school. I aspire to continue my education in clinical psychology specifically. I hope to integrate the knowledge and skills I learn throughout the process of this research project and presentation into my future education.

Major

Psychology

Advisor for this project

Dr. Jennifer Tiano

Start Date

20-4-2018 11:15 AM

End Date

20-4-2018 12:15 PM

Abstract

Comparing Acceptability of a Parent Training Program Among Rural and Urban Undergraduates

Hunter, A., Johnson, C., Gibson, J., & Tiano, J.

Abstract

Approximately 3.5% of children ages three to thirteen are diagnosed with behavioral or conduct problems. Literature indicates that the prevalence of behavioral problems is increasing. Children residing in rural areas are more likely to display behavioral problems as compared to children residing in urban areas. Behavioral Parent Training (BPT) aids caregivers by altering parenting behavior toward children with challenging behaviors. Research on rates of BPT acceptability have found mixed results. Parent-Children Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an empirically supported BPT for children ages 2-7 and their caregiver(s) that aims to reduce child externalizing behaviors. PCIT increases positive interactions, adjusts behavior management techniques, and increases the sensitivity of caregivers. Acceptability of treatment relates to clients’ perception of appropriateness of the procedures, which impacts its effectiveness. PCIT acceptability among families residing in rural areas has not been extensively studied. However, caregivers who reside in rural areas may be sensitive to behavioral parenting programs due to cultural and interpersonal barriers. Moreover, examination of the PCIT acceptability rate among nonparental caregivers is lacking, as well. Nonetheless, it is found that nonparental undergraduates are open and able to learn parenting strategies reinforced in PCIT. This study compared PCIT acceptability among undergraduate psychology students identifying as having a rural or urban background. Six hundred two students completed an online assessment on child behavior and PCIT acceptability. Results indicate that there was not a significant difference in students’ identified background and PCIT acceptability, F (593) = 1.04, p = .308.

Keywords: parent-child interaction therapy; behavioral parent training; acceptability; rural; urban; nonparents

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Apr 20th, 11:15 AM Apr 20th, 12:15 PM

Comparing Acceptability of a Parent Training Program Among Rural and Urban Undergraduates

Comparing Acceptability of a Parent Training Program Among Rural and Urban Undergraduates

Hunter, A., Johnson, C., Gibson, J., & Tiano, J.

Abstract

Approximately 3.5% of children ages three to thirteen are diagnosed with behavioral or conduct problems. Literature indicates that the prevalence of behavioral problems is increasing. Children residing in rural areas are more likely to display behavioral problems as compared to children residing in urban areas. Behavioral Parent Training (BPT) aids caregivers by altering parenting behavior toward children with challenging behaviors. Research on rates of BPT acceptability have found mixed results. Parent-Children Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an empirically supported BPT for children ages 2-7 and their caregiver(s) that aims to reduce child externalizing behaviors. PCIT increases positive interactions, adjusts behavior management techniques, and increases the sensitivity of caregivers. Acceptability of treatment relates to clients’ perception of appropriateness of the procedures, which impacts its effectiveness. PCIT acceptability among families residing in rural areas has not been extensively studied. However, caregivers who reside in rural areas may be sensitive to behavioral parenting programs due to cultural and interpersonal barriers. Moreover, examination of the PCIT acceptability rate among nonparental caregivers is lacking, as well. Nonetheless, it is found that nonparental undergraduates are open and able to learn parenting strategies reinforced in PCIT. This study compared PCIT acceptability among undergraduate psychology students identifying as having a rural or urban background. Six hundred two students completed an online assessment on child behavior and PCIT acceptability. Results indicate that there was not a significant difference in students’ identified background and PCIT acceptability, F (593) = 1.04, p = .308.

Keywords: parent-child interaction therapy; behavioral parent training; acceptability; rural; urban; nonparents